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Mega Man Game by Game: Everything You Need to Know About ‘Mega Man 1’

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With Mega Man 11 set to release on October 2nd, the Blue Bomber will be starring in his first core series game since 2010. You all know how much the little scamp likes to get around, starring in hundreds of games and several spin-off series, but it’s hard to argue that anything holds the hearts and minds of fans quite like the good old originals.

Known for their brutal, heartless platforming, wacky robot master bosses and pounding chiptune soundtracks, the Mega Man series deserves to continue its legacy into the future. To celebrate its impending return, I’m taking a gif-laden trip down memory lane to break down games 1-10 – enduring the hardships so you don’t have to (unless you want to). I want to preface this series by stating that I am by no means the greatest Mega Man player ever. I’ve beaten most of these games before – some several times – but you won’t see me annihilating them at GDQ any time soon. Trust me, my lack of skills at these games will make for a much more entertaining time. With that out of the way, let’s settle into Mega Man 1.

Bomb Man

Bomb Man has the unfortunate title of ‘boss we can most easily take down without a special weapon,’ so it’s time to go smash him up with the Mega Buster. There is, of course, a level to get through first and Bomb Man’s stage starts off almost as the anti-platformer to anyone expecting the kind of easy ride you get in a Mario 1-1 stage. You’re not far into the level before the pesky Kamadoma will spring themselves right into your face. Doesn’t matter how high you jump or how far away you stand, their accuracy is pretty lethal.

Lethal accuracy is going to be a common theme in this game (and, indeed, series), as the next challenge is to try and traverse death pits that kill Mega Man, but are fine domiciles for the brilliantly-named Bombombomb enemies. They will come leaping out of gaps like deadly, self-destructing salmon, spraying projectiles in four directions that will knock you back and send you falling to an early robot grave if you’re not careful (and I rarely am).

Mega Man 1

I got this, I got this, I got this… DAAAAAARGH! I don’t got this

Of course, even in the first entry, this wouldn’t be Mega Man without several climbing sections under enemy fire designed to send you off the bottom of the screen on your way up a ladder, and this level has a lot of that. Everything in this level is designed to knock you down gaps, it seems, and the later addition of Killer Bombs and Mambu can often make the screen an awkward, explodey mess.

As far as I can remember, and my memory is admittedly hazy, this is the only Mega Man game in which the boss doors don’t lead immediately to the boss. Bomb Man has prepared for us a nice little leap of faith before we can face him, and the enemies can be avoided if you hug the right like a tactile Republican.

Mega Man 1

Even with taking hits, the damage from the bombs just isn’t enough to worry about

The boss himself is a mix of jumping attacks and bomb throws, which hurt if they hit you and if they explode (obviously). To look at him, you can see he’s a pretty chunky guy, and this manifests in a relatively slow jumping arc. His bombs are pretty easy to avoid as well – which is some decent foreshadowing for how lame the weapon is to use – and he should be down in no time.

Difficulty: 3/5
Boss: 3/5
Music: 3/5

Guts Man

As I stated earlier, I’m no expert on every frame in this game. My only logical understanding, then, is that the platforms in the early part of this level are on some kind of random timer developed by Satan himself. Well, probably by Dr. Wily, actually, and he’s a close second. Honestly, I hate these and their flappy insta-death bullshit. Flapforms, that’s what they are.

Mega Man 1

You know the old saying – you wait all day for a platform and then you die

After screaming the house down in frustration through the flapform section, there’s the reward of a couple of encounters with the Pickelman enemies (yeah, really). Think of them as blue-collar Hammer Bros with even better aim and a shield. Their throws are almost homing missiles, as they will adjust distance and speed if you move further away like the big coward I am.

Mega Man 1

That’s how you do it, folks. Only took me ten tries as well

After more faith leaps (now with added spikes!), it’s time to meet Big Eye for the first time. These big stampy bastards will absolutely drain Mega Man’s health if they connect, and connect they almost certainly will. They took a big swig of RNG before they left the house for work this morning, and they’re in the mood for winding someone up.

Luckily, after such a hellish level, Guts Man will quickly realize that his late-night prayers to not face any bombs today have gone unanswered. He hates them. Three will do it, and he’ll be done in seconds.

Mega Man 1

I can kill this dude while sitting on my ass. What a chump

Difficulty: 4/5
Boss: 1/5
Music: 2/5

Cut Man

My word, this level is SO GREEN. Luckily, this is one of the easier levels in the game and should help you avoid the inevitable seizure that staring at the background will cause after too long. It’s mainly just a lot of ladders to climb, as you dodge Blasters that don’t have great accuracy and only fire one bullet at a time. They’re not even worth shooting.

After what seems like a million screens of ladders and Blasters comes some screens of yet more ladders –  this time guarded by the incredible Adhering Suzy enemies. The only thing they adhere to is moving in a couple of straight lines, but they move fast, take a fair few hits to kill and are worth destroying to make life easier.

Mega Man 1

OH COME ON!

Towards the end of the level is the return of Big Eye, this time sporting a delightful shade of pink. Maybe it’s Mrs Big Eye? The old girl will patiently wait for you at the bottom of the platform you’re on like a hunter, and just when you think you’ve chucked a bomb down to destroy her, she’ll start coming after you. Clever girl. You can use the newly acquired Super Arm to carve a little safe space in the bottom layer of the bricks if you’re feeling cool, but I’ve no time for that.

Mega Man 1

Eat this! No wait, I’m sorry OK? I’M SORRY!

The Super Arm is a glorious tool for the boss, as Cut Man is even easier than Guts Man if you manage to pick up and accurately hurl his convenient brick stash back into his face. The two bricks are all it takes to ensure he won’t be going home to his kids tonight.

Mega Man 1

Bish, bash, bosh. Man, that was easier than I remember

Difficulty: 2/5
Boss: 2/5
Music: 3/5

Elec Man

The start of Elec Man’s level is very fiddly, to say the least. Do yourself a favour and use Cut Man’s weapon to destroy the Gabyoall (seriously, what were they on when naming the enemies in this game?), as Mega Buster fire will only freeze them and lead to mucho frustrato.

Mega Man 1

Do yourself a favour – don’t ever try to do it this way

If you’re awesome, the Metal Gear Solid 3-esque ladder climb will pose no threat. If your reflexes and accuracy are on point, the Watcher enemies will be sent packing before they’ve even said hello. If you’re doing the optimized order, your next challenge is the game’s first appearance of everyone’s favorite timer-based disappearing platforms! Check out that drop if you fail! Yay!

Mega Man 1

And 3, 2, 1… NOOOOOOOOOOOO!

One of the cheekiest health pickups in the game is there for the taking of the brave and the bold, and it honestly still makes my palms sweat even now. Classic Mega Man risk/reward level design right there. Another ladder climb proves the Watchers obviously heard your disparaging remarks earlier and called their mates in – now posing much more of a threat thanks to the sheer numbers game.

Mega Man 1

Ok, got it…Nope. This time… Nope. Here it comes… Nope!

The end of the level almost peters out into monotony with copy and paste platforming made up of death pits and electricity (naturally). Get through all that, run under Big Eye and get ready to embarrass Elec Man. He will go down like a little bitch with a skinned knee if you have the right weapon, which of course you do. Three hits of the Cut Blade will do him in.

Mega Man 1

He doesn’t even last ten seconds!

Difficulty: 4/5
Boss: 1/5
Music: 4/5

Ice Man

Ice Man doesn’t look very imposing does he? He just looks cold if anything. Bless him, he wrapped up warm just like Momma told him. His stage wins the prize for worst music, hands down; it squeals and squeaks its way right to the very depths of your soul.  

Crazy Razy (honestly, not making these up) is comin’ atcha as this level starts, so make sure to go for headshots lest their decapitated heads fly towards you once their body is no more. It’s then time to enter the underwater domain of Pepe the propeller penguin and all his constantly respawning cousins.  

Mega Man 1

Like a glove! Only took me ten minutes…

Now the fun begins. The two slippery, disappearing platform sections are a ruddy nightmare, with several blind jumps to make, Gabyoall’s to deal with and an insultingly long wait time if you mess up and have to wait for the cycle to start over.

If you thought the previous section was hellish, the horrific platform-riding section that follows is probably my most hated part of the game. Dealing with the Foot Holder platforms trying to shoot you just as you go for the next jump would be bad enough if Pepe’s family reunion wasn’t still going on in your face. You need some serious help from the RNG gods here, as the Foot Holders will sometimes not even make the correct height for you to get to the other side!

Mega Man 1

Just a little higher. Higher. Come on, HIGHER!

Again, after such a hard level, it’s refreshing that Ice Man is pretty tame. It’s at this point you can use the Thunder Beam Trick to pause-scum your way to an easy win, but at this stage, he’s so weak to it anyway that three honest hits will ruin his shit easily enough.

Mega Man 1

This goober doesn’t even last seven seconds! Guess he really is as weak as he looks

Difficulty: 5/5
Boss: 2/5
Music: 1/5

Fire Man

What’s the best way to deal with fire? Ice, of course, you idiot, it’s science! Look out, Fire Man, we’re going reverse Pokémon on yo’ ass!

The level itself packs nowhere near the difficulty and frustration of Ice Man’s, even though the enemies are an instant pain. Fire comes at you from all angles, as Changkey (fireballs, basically) rain from the sky to make your traversal over the lava pits and around flame pillars just that little bit more sweaty.

Mega Man 1

Pretty sure I stand on the fire at one point in this clip…

It’s at this point that I realised I had the platform gun. I swear I didn’t have it before now, but it certainly makes life a lot easier for upcoming sections. Whether jumping over entire segments of the level of skipping past unavoidable fire blocks, it’s incredibly handy, if not necessary.

Mega Man 1

Jackpot, baby! You wouldn’t believe this happened if I didn’t have proof

There are two cheeky fire pillars right in front of the boss door, which should never be entered without first doing some incredibly sneaky farming of the Changkeys to replenish health. It’s needed for Fire Man, as he’s comfortably the hardest of the Robot Masters. His fire projectiles are ridiculously fast and hard to avoid, and he laughs at your measly Ice Blaster. I wonder why…

Mega Man 1

Seriously, how am I meant to avoid all those?

Difficulty: 3/5
Boss: 4/5
Music: 2/5

Dr. Wily 1

My playthrough of this game was something of an epiphany for me. The Big Eyes at the start of this level can annihilate your health before you even get started. That was until I finally realized you can freeze them with the Ice Blaster. D’oh. Better late than never!

If you want to tick off ways to put a player through hell, this level has it nailed down. Flame pillars obscuring the tightest jumps ever? Check. Relentless Killer Bombs attacking as you try to leap over instadeath spikes? Check. Spike pit over the top of the shooty Foot Holder platforms? Oh, you better believe that’s a check.

Yellow Devil Boss

Mega Man 1

Can you really blame me for cheating for this guy? Just look at this nonsense

I hate this jerk. He’s the worst, and he wrecks me every time. I also hate him in Smash Bros. but here is his true masterpiece of pain. In the interest of actually completing this game, I decided I had to finally try the Thunder Beam cheat on him. Being wrong never felt so right. No regrets.  

Mega Man 1

Haha! Now who’s laughing?! What does “hollow victory” mean?

Difficulty: 4/5
Boss: 5/5 (1/5 if you cheat)
Music: 3/5

Dr. Wily 2

The stupid, grinning Bunby Heli enemies make even easy jumps at the start of this level a nightmare, but the Thunder Beam is the way to go to stop them in their tracks. Once that’s done, it’s time to strap in – it’s boss rush time!

Mega Man 1

It’s the only way to do this, trust me. Works like a charm

Cut Man’s first up, and this time without the use of blocks for the easy Super Arm kill. He’s still not much of a challenge with his slow weapon arc, and once he’s among the el muerto, Elec Man wades in to try and finish you off. It’s worth noting there has still been no checkpoint in the level yet.

Mega Man 1

Pro tip: just don’t ever try and get this

Once those fools have been taken to school, you finally get a checkpoint, which is needed thanks to the horrible descent through a ladder, spike, and Adhering Suzy country. The Thunder Blade works for killing enemies below you but it’s going to run out soon. Like my dad always used to say when I wanted more candy, “when they’re gone, they’re gone.”

Mega Man 1

Every time I go to watch this, I still don’t know which one is me until the clone dies

A Mega Man clone is up next, and it was at this point that I decided to go all in on the Thunder Beam trick. I get it, I’m scum, but Dr. Wily is worse. Two wrongs still feel like they make a right to me.

Difficulty: 4/5
Boss: 3/5 (1/5 if you cheat)
Music: 0/5 (reused)

Dr. Wily 3

Wily 3 is actually one of the easier levels in the game, and the only reason for that has to be how difficult the boss is. You’re met with big drops, Blasters and Adhering Suzies, but just whip out the Cut Blade for safety and leg it! You escape down a tunnel that sweeps you forward with what I assume is water, and it forces you head-on into varying enemies like Pepe and Killer Bombs at a speed that makes things difficult, but not unmanageable.

CWU-01P Boss

Mega Man 1

Talk about hanging on by the skin of your teeth!

CWU-01P is absolutely nails. I’m pretty sure you’ve got to manipulate where it comes on to the screen to help avoid it, but no such luck for me. There are some blocks lying around for the Super Arm that it’s weak to (not enough to kill it, sadly), but once you use them, they’re gone if you don’t kill it until you game over, and all subsequent tries are best done with the Mega Buster.

Difficulty: 2/5
Boss: 4/5
Music: 2/5

Dr. Wily 4

Perhaps the previous level was lulling you into a false sense of security because this level is ‘more like it’. Starting with a ladder climb where one Watcher shot is going to end you, then follows a tunnel of pain with Blasters are everywhere. I’m too lazy to do anything but soak up damage as I run through it at this point.

Mega Man 1

Yes! I did it! I’m the grea…ah shit

Oh, there’s still time for some flapforming over spikes pits, and this time you have to use the platform gun and some sexy timing to make your way to safety – picking up an extra life and equipment if you’re brave enough (or realize it’s possible).

The boss rush continues as Bomb Man returns to finally taste that fire he hates so much (we didn’t have it the first time), and he’s immediately followed by Fire Man – the last prick you want to see on low health. Whip out that Ice Beam and pray, folks. Cheat your way through Ice Man in four seconds, blow up Guts Man and you’re finally ready to take on that grey haired scumbag, Dr. Wily himself.

Mega Man 1

This double KO would be awesome if it wasn’t TOTAL BULLSHIT

His first form is incredibly easy with the Fire Storm equipped, but it’s the second form where the shit really hits the fan. If you don’t use the Thunder Beam cheat to earn a hollow victory, you’re a better person than me. This stage is near-impossible to a scrub like me. But hey, cheaters prosper sometimes – I have proof.

Mega Man 1

Hey, at least if people out there didn’t know how to cheat I’m just helping them along. Quit judgin’

Difficulty: 4/5
Boss: 4/5
Music: 5/5 (credits only)

The beautiful credits music makes the whole arduous journey worthwhile. Mega Man wouldn’t see true success until the sequel, which is one of my favourite games of all time. The original is arguably tougher, and a lot less imaginative, but we made it to the end and Wily is begging for mercy. Good job we spared him, we’ve got 9 more games to get through yet.

Crotchety Englishman who spends hundreds of pounds on video game tattoos and Amiibo in equally wallet-crippling measure. Likes grammar a lot, but not as much as he likes ranting about the latest gaming news in his weekly column.

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Game Reviews

‘Life is Strange 2’ Episode 5 Review – “Wolves”: A Worthy Send-off

The final episode of Life is Strange 2 may take a while to get going but it does offer a solid conclusion to the Diaz brothers’ journey.

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Life is Strange 2

Life is Strange 2 hasn’t made any bones about being a political game over the course of the last year. The 5th, and final episode, “Wolves”, doesn’t just continue with this message, it doubles down, and in a big way.

Set near the Arizona-Mexico border, “Wolves” follows the Diaz brothers on the final leg of their journey. Having escaped from the cult that held Daniel up as a messianic figure in the previous episode, Sean and Daniel are camping out in a sort of pop-up town filled with outsiders like themselves.

Life is Strange 2

The location provides Life is Strange 2 with its final breath of relaxation before the story enters its high tension endgame, and it’s a much needed reprieve. Unfortunately, it does seem to go on a bit longer than the player might like, and that makes things drag a smidge.

To give you some idea of how long you’ll be spending in the village, 4 of the 6 collectibles are found here. So, yes, this starting area is the main place you’ll be spending “Wolves” in. To be clear, the area isn’t bad per se. There’s a lot to see, a scavenger hunt to go on, and a few interesting characters to speak with, including a surprise cameo from the original game. The bummer of it all is that players will be feeling the time here more laboriously simply because there isn’t much of anything happening.

Life is Strange 2

In the 2nd or 3rd episode of this story it’s perfectly fine for an extended bit of down time. Episode 3, in particular, benefited greatly from allowing you to settle into the setting and get to know a diverse and likable new group of characters. However, by the 5th episode, players will be so eager to see how things are gonna settle up, they won’t be able to get out of this area fast enough.

On the upswing, once Sean and Daniel leave the village, the story moves at a pretty solid clip to the credits. As the key art and trailer for “Wolves” might suggest, the Diaz brothers do indeed challenge the border wall in the final leg of Life is Strange 2. Where things go from there, I won’t spoil, but rest assured that Daniel will absolutely go through the crisis as you’ve trained him to do.

By this I mean, you will see the final results of your choices throughout the game, and they’re pretty impressive. With 4 possible endings, and 3 possible variations on those endings, Life is Strange 2 can ultimately play out in a variety of ways. How yours plays out will, of course, depend on the choices you’ve made and how you’ve influenced your brother throughout your journey.

Either way, though, Life is Strange 2 closes off “Wolves” with an emotionally satisfying and generally fulfilling conclusion to your journey. It might be a necessary evil that the events can’t be intense the whole way through, being that this is not an action or combat-focused game, but the fact that things take so long to get going in the final episode is a bit of a problem.

Still, fans worried that Life is Strange 2 might fail to stick the landing can rest easy. “Wolves” might not be the best, or most satisfying, episode of the series but it does what it needs to do and it does it well, particularly in the back half.

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Game Reviews

‘Yaga’ Review: A Bittersweet Fairy Tale

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Yaga Game Review

Some games feel perfectly suited to their genres, as if they fulfill every ambition that their genre could promise. On paper, Yaga from the developer Breadcrumbs Interactive, should be one of those games. This roguelike RPG is meant to bring traditional Slavic folktales to life, and its procedurally generated structure allows the game to change in every playthrough, just like how the ancient fairy tales it’s based on can change in every telling. Yaga immediately shines on a conceptual level, but as a game, the most important question remains: will this fairy tale be enjoyable to play?

From start to finish, Yaga uses the rich source material of Eastern European history and folklore to create a vibrant, fantastical world. The entire game is framed as three elderly women telling the story of Ivan, a heroic blacksmith who has been stricken with the curse of bad luck. These women spin a fanciful yarn, one in which Ivan is constantly plagued by horrors from traditional fairy tales such as the hideous One-Eyed Likho, along with more realistic foes, such as a corrupt, overbearing Tsar. The game thrives on this balance between history and fantasy. Its world is filled with peasants who face daily, universal struggles with war and agriculture, while massive ogres and goblin-like Vodyanoys haunt the surrounding wilderness. This mixture creates a strong setting that finally gives Slavic history and mythology its long-overdue representation in games.

Yaga Game Review

“Take the presentation and story together, and Yaga becomes a playable portrait of the lives and superstitions of Eastern European peasants.”

The frame story always remains the same: Ivan will always have to serve his Tsar while avoiding bad luck in every playthrough. However, beyond these core details, the old women are extremely flexible storytellers, often switching events around or changing story beats entirely. In some playthroughs, you may discover a woman raising an enormous chicken; in others, you may instead encounter a band of thieves waiting to rob you. You will frequently face important decisions to make that will dramatically impact the outcome of your quest. yes, you can always break into monster hideouts with hammers blazing to slay every creature before you; but more often than not, you are also given the opportunity to peacefully talk your way out of these toxic situations. Even more dramatically, oftentimes the game will zoom out to the old women storytellers and allow you to choose how they tell the rest of Ivan’s story. Yaga is at its best when it doubles down on this player freedom. It makes every moment engaging and allows its stories to truly come alive.

Yaga

Yaga’s writing and presentation only serve to make this world even more striking. It features a distinctly dark sense of humor – for instance, a man may ask you to push a boulder into a well behind his house, but he will neglect to tell you that he has also thrown his wife into the bottom of that well ahead of time. Much of this dialogue is even written in rhyme, enhancing the otherworldly, fairy tale atmosphere. On top of that, nearly all dialogue is fully voice acted, with most voice actors delivering some eccentrically charming performances that make the game feel as if it’s a playable Disney film. The visuals look like they’re taken straight out of a Russian children’s book of fairy tales, while the music incorporates traditional instruments and language into an electronic, hip-hop fusion soundtrack that captures the cultural heritage that Yaga focuses on while connecting it to modern culture. Take the presentation and story together, and Yaga becomes a playable portrait of the lives and superstitions of Eastern European peasants.

However, this leads to the gameplay. Quests may be randomized each time you play, but nearly every one of them takes the same general format. One character will request help, and then Ivan will have to venture out into the world to fight some demons or recover an item. Worse yet, the levels are just as randomized in their procedurally generated design, and not in a particularly clever way, either: most of them likewise follow the same formula, being little more than arenas full of enemies connected by copy-and-paste environments. Many paths in each environment lead to nothing more than pointless dead ends. The combat has a satisfyingly simple basis, with basic moves like long- and close-range attacks, roll dodging, items to use, and a variety of different weapons to equip, although his trusty old hammer is generally the best choice. However, while this simplicity makes the combat enjoyable on its own, there is very little depth to it, and the inherently repetitive design of the mission only serves to highlight how paper-thin combat can be. Most battles involve little more than hacking away at enemies until they die, which becomes increasingly repetitive by the end of the roughly ten-hour campaign.

Yaga

At the very least, the robust customization system helps add a little intrigue to the combat. As a blacksmith, Ivan is naturally gifted with the ability to craft weapons for himself to use. By scavenging parts and items from fallen enemies and treasure chests around the world, Ivan is able to create the most powerful weapons. Crafting is simple to use yet extremely ripe for experimentation, requiring only one base item and a handful of accessories to create unique new items. With dozens of components to discover and use in your forging, there are plentiful opportunities to create the best possible weapons.

“All told, Yaga achieves a bittersweet ending: it’s bitter as a game but sweet as a fairy tale.”

The crafting system would be the standout aspect of the moment-to-moment gameplay if it weren’t foiled by another one of the game’s systems: Bad Luck. Ivan has been cursed with perpetual Bad Luck, which grows constantly throughout the game – whenever something good happens, Bad Luck is sure to increase. Whenever the Bad Luck meter fills all the way, Likho will appear and strike Ivan, generally breaking one of his weapons or stealing his money.

Yaga Game Review

On paper, this mechanic makes sense, since it prohibits the player from becoming too overpowered and also fits into the folklore style off the story. In practice, however, it is an infuriating limitation on player progression and invention. It effectively punishes players for putting thought and care into their weapon crafting and character-building – at any moment it can all be washed away in bad luck, so what’s the point? Considering how enjoyable the crafting and combat systems are, it’s a shame that Bad Luck seems to exist solely to diminish the very best parts of the gameplay, leaving the game feeling like it cripples itself.

Your enjoyment of Yaga depends heavily on what experience you want out of it. If you’re looking for a deep and satisfying RPG, then it likely won’t deliver. Although it features satisfying combat and customization systems, the frustrating randomization of its level design and Bad Luck system only serve to foil these good qualities. If you are instead looking for a faithful, fleshed-out image of Slavic cultural heritage, portraying both the harsh realities of peasant life along with its fanciful folklore, then Yaga is a clear triumph thanks to its emphasis on player choice, its excellent writing, and its beautiful hand-drawn visuals and inventive soundtrack. All told, Yaga achieves a bittersweet ending: it’s bitter as a game but sweet as a fairy tale.

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Games

‘Resident Evil 3: Nemesis’ — A New Height to Survival-Horror

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Resident Evil 3 Nemesis

If we can forget that Nemesis was a poorly designed rubber goof in the Resident Evil: Apocalypse movie, we can easily state that he is the apex predator of the series. The follow-up to Resident Evil 2 had quite a few expectations to fill and, for the most part, Resident Evil 3 delivered. While not so much a fan-favorite as RE2, there was a lot to like about RE3. The return of RE‘s Jill Valentine, some new intuitive controls, and, of course, theNemesis.

RE3 marks the first time in the series where you are limited to one character – Jill. Through this, the story is slightly more focused and straightforward – despite the plot being all about Jill trying to leave Raccoon City. RE3 director Kazuhiro Aoyama cleverly sets in pieces of RE2 to make this work as both a prequel and a sequel. If you’ve never played RE2 – shame on you – you would not be able to scout notable tie-ins such as the police station. With a large majority of the building still locked up, Marvin Branagh, the wounded police officer who helps you in the second game, is still unconscious and has yet to give anyone the keycard which unlocks the emergency security system.

resident_evil_3_psx_marvin_branagh_by_danytatu-d812bgk-768x480

Where RE3 really shines is in its latest entry of Umbrella Corps. bio-engineered tyrants called Nemesis. The hulking tank brought a new dimension to the series, invoking more cringe-inducing terror and stress than ever. As if zombies and critters jumping through windows weren’t bad enough, now you have to worry about an RPG-wielding maniac busting through a wall and chasing you around the entirety of the immediate environment – and chase is certainly brought to a whole new level indeed. It became a running joke when you would encounter a handful of zombies, but could escape unscathed by simply running into another room. Nemesis, on the other hand, will continue his pursuit no matter what room you run into. At the time, this brought a whole new level of detail in the genre. Knowing that at any given moment he will just appear and will certainly derail whatever key or plot item you’re quested to look for made Nemesis a very intense experience.

Resident Evil 3 is the pinnacle of the series and the last of old-school survival-horror.

The gameplay also takes a few different approaches in this game. There will be moments when you encounter Nemesis, or certain plot occasions where you will be prompted to make a decision. It was a great alteration to the series, as it added new layers and weight for the player. Another addition to the gameplay came in the form of control although as minute as it sounds, is having the ability to turn a full 180 degrees – yes you read that correctly. Resident Evil quintessentially coined the term survival-horror, and survival certainly predicates the genre. There will be times – if not numerous times, you will run out of ammo. When those moments used to occur, you would have to make your character turn in the slowest fashion imaginable to make a run for the door and to safety. It was those moments back then that would pull the player away from the action. With the addition of the quick-turn ability- which was actually first introduced in Capcom’ Dino Crisis game – it gave the player the chance to just cap a few zombies and dash creating more seamless and dynamic gameplay.

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The level design of Resident Evil 3 is grand, if not grander than RE2. A lot of the setting and scenery take place in the open air of the city and a few other places around the vicinity. RE and RE2 mostly took place indoors, and those settings helped create unique moods especially when it is all about tight corridors adding a more claustrophobic feel. Aoyama definitely went with a bigger setting and atmosphere in the follow-up. The game takes you through a police station, a hospital, a local newspaper office, a clock tower and a factory. More often than not, though, people tend to forget the scope and grandeur of RE3. Not to mention you can only… spoiler… kill Nemesis with a Rail-Gun at the end.

Resident Evil 3 is the pinnacle of the series and the last of old-school survival-horror. It took everything that it did so well in the previous titles and made it bigger and better. Nemesis encapsulated fear and dread in ways rarely experienced at the time. The scene where he popped through a window and chased players through the police station has always remained a nostalgic moment, much like anything that comes through a window in the RE series. In fact, a bit of advice for anyone playing the first-gen of RE titles: beware of windows.

Editor’s Note: This article was originally published on May 16, 2016.

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