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The Wake Left by the Wolverine: How Fox Should Handle ‘X-Men’ Going Forward

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When Hugh Jackman announced he would be hanging up the claws for good after Logan, Fox lost more than just the face of its X-Men franchise. With the actor’s departure, the series also lost its heart and soul.

In a perfect world, Logan could operate not only as a send-off for Hugh Jackman and Patrick Stewart (who also announced that the sequel would be his final appearance as Charles Xavier), but as a beautiful goodbye to the entire X-Men cinematic universe. Unfortunately, the world we live in is far from perfect.

Fox is a business first and foremost. While they have shown a willingness recently to step outside the box when it comes to bigger superhero films (Deadpool and Logan’s R-ratings) and insanely creative small screen adaptations (Legion), they aren’t going to stop churning out movies just because a fitting end arose from a story perspective.

While X-Men isn’t currently as renowned as The Avengers, it is still a massive franchise that lends itself well to the contemporary state of the entertainment industry. Almost everyone in Hollywood is hell-bent on following Marvel’s mold of connected universes. Some projects have potential (Kong and Godzilla), while others have left many fans scratching their heads (the proposed Men in Black and 21 Jump Street crossover). X-Men works perfectly for interconnected content, and Marvel proved it with the success of the property’s source material.

When Chris Claremont transformed the title into the juggernaut (I’ll see myself out) of the comic scene during the ‘80s and ‘90s, Marvel put as many X-related books on the racks as possible. Many of the spinoff titles and characters created during that time are still in print to this day. Fox has the toybox at their disposal to keep this franchise alive, but everything lies in the execution. And the company must be silently panicking as they consider the solution to the biggest problem lying ahead:

How do you continue X-Men without its (adamantium-laced) backbone?

First, Fox needs to take the time to evaluate and understand what has or hasn’t been working, particularly in the time since the company attempted to soft reboot the franchise with X-Men: First Class. While they made some smart choices with its casting and the finished product was solid, First Class showed that the studio struggled when it came to maintaining a cohesive continuity.

By comparison, the Marvel Cinematic Universe was built organically from the ground up and is constantly moving forward. With X-Men, however, the series went backwards, both literally and figuratively. The path proved treacherous as plot holes and poorly conceived retcons littered the way.

Occasionally, the result was a great film regardless of any inconsistencies (Days of Future Past). At other times, the stories suffered as later movies failed in simply finding their place within the overall X-Men framework (X-Men Origins: Wolverine).

Instead of attempting soft reboots and half-measures, Fox needs to pick a launching point and never look back.

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The strongest asset going forward for the series is the success of its latest installments. Besides both being big box office hits, one aspect that Deadpool and Logan both share is the fact that X-Men is nowhere to be found in their titles. Their giant box office returns proved that fans aren’t as brand-focused as most companies would lead you to believe.

Audiences didn’t go out in droves to watch Deadpool and Logan because they were X-Men movies. They sought them out because they were good movies filled with great characters, and it is the potential of these characters that gives the franchise hope.

It is time for these newer faces to shine, but they must be characters like Hugh Jackman’s Wolverine who resonate with the audience. They must be fully developed from a writing perspective and not just names on a page. For instance, even though Cyclops and Jean Grey are much more recognizable characters, fans have gravitated much more towards X-23 in Logan than they did either of the two leads of X-Men: Apocalypse. This is because the script takes more time to flesh out Laura as a character, and she connects with the viewer as a result.

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It’s time for a paradigm shift. X-Men needs to take a step back as a new team comes to the forefront. Instead of a traditional team up, perhaps a Legends of Tomorrow vibe might better suit the franchise as it reinvents itself. Pick the side characters that fans have grown to love and let their colorful personalities clash together in the best way possible.

Maybe Deadpool could headline an X-Force movie populated with a ragtag assortment of the likes of Cable, Colossus, Quicksilver, and Negasonic Teenage Warhead? Perhaps they can even find a way to get X-23 involved? Cable does time travel, after all…

One thing is certain, however. If X-Men is going to survive, it must take a page from its own books:

It’s time to evolve.

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My name is Geoff and I believe purgatory is the state of never being able to fully clear out your DVR. I spend my time staying up way too late reading books, playing video games, and watching movies and TV. You can find me on Twitter at @GeoffMiller47

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‘Read Only Memories’ Comic is Well Worth Reading

Based on the hit game of the same name.

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Read Only Memories IDW Comic Review

Gritty detective stories set in the future have been a source of great creativity in a variety of media forms since the days of Blade Runner. Read Only Memories, the new title from IDW, is no exception to that. It takes classic tropes of both genres and mixes them with a new style.

Lexi Rivers

Santa Cruz, California. 2067. Lexi Rivers is a private investigator who takes on a case from a newly sapient robot. She’s tough but not in that ubiquitous “badass” way female characters are often slotted into.

From moment one, she is interesting and engaging. Lexi starts by posing as a reporter to interrogate a target. Initially, her goal is to determine if the woman is faithful to her partner or not. It’s a classic detective case.

In many ways, Lexi’s a classic detective. She takes rough, morally questionable jobs to make ends meet. Lexi has feelings for a woman who’s probably too good for her. She sneaks favors from friends to make something out of nothing.

Lexi is a detective through and through.

The Story

Read Only Memories

After leaving one case behind, she encounters Hedy, a robot in search of its missing loved one. The story then deftly carries the reader through different locations and people. This is how the story introduces you to the futuristic world and defines Lexi’s life with as little exposition as possible.

Sina Grace, the writer, is extremely effective at doing just that.

Fortunately, a running internal monologue is a huge part of the detective genre. It gives the storyteller a means to get out important information and key details without seeming out of place. Realistically, Read Only Memories has a lot of details to pick up on in the early going.

It’s a big world filled with numerous moving parts. Thankfully, the story gives you what you need to understand. You’re not confused by what’s going on because some of it’s familiar from other stories. Read Only Memories successfully takes those familiar parts and does something interesting with them.

Visual Style

Read Only Memories

Realistically, it can be hard to set the tone of a futuristic detective story without feeling derivative. Stefano Simeone, the artist, has chosen a style that conveys the futuristic vibe well.

Quite smartly, Stefano uses a color palette that sets it apart from the standard detective genre but creates a futuristic feel. Mostly, it’s wonderful shades of pink, blue, and purple. The look is unique and fantastic.

Read Only Memories: What’s Next

Remember, this is only the first issue. In the end, it leaves you in that classic detective story moment. You realize that the simple case is a lot more complicated. Issue two should build nicely from there.

Additionally, it’s worth noting that issue one isn’t burdened by gratuitous or unnecessary violence. Lexi does get her clock cleaned by a gang member who doesn’t like her sticking her nose where it doesn’t belong. But that’s it.

Yet another classic detective moment.

There will certainly be more action in future issues but this is a smart way to start. It puts the focus on the narrative and not the violence. If it starts with an action-packed issue, then that is what readers will expect throughout the series.

Reading along as Lexi unravels the mystery presented by Hedy will be amazing. Truthfully, the true test of this story will be in its resolution. Preferably, the journey should be enjoyable but a mystery’s conclusion has to be satisfactory to be worth it.

The rest of the series will be more than worth the read if issue one of Read Only Memories is any indication.

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Comics Editor Allison O’Toole Talks Kickstarter for Wayward Kindred

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Wayward Kindred is raising funds with Kickstarter.

If you enjoyed the Wayward Sisters anthology from TO Comix Press, they have a Kickstarter for its spiritual successor, Wayward Kindred. After holding an open call for submissions earlier this year, Wayward Kindred is pressing forward with its goal to tell a wide range of stories about monsters and families. Previews of the anthology include a cursed skeleton uncle, half-vampire teens, siblings transformed into wolves by their aunt, and sentient insects teaching their language to a human child. It looks like a fascinating mix of different stories and art styles funneled through the captivating vision of monsters.

After editing the award-winning Wayward Sisters, Allison O’Toole is back to edit Wayward Kindred. A freelance comics editor, she’s worked on a growing list of comics, including Jason Loo’s The Pitiful Human-Lizard, Sam Beck’s Verse, and other TO Comix Press publications like volumes of The Toronto Comics Anthology. With a few days left to raise funds, O’Toole was able to speak with Goomba Stomp via email about the Kickstarter for Wayward Kindred and her work in editing comics.

GS: How would you describe your role as a comics editor? Is it a lot of project management and big picture development with some oversight over language?

Allison O’Toole: That does cover a lot of it! The editor has her hands on every stage of the comic, from the pitch all the way to the lettering, so you’re doing the expected editing tasks at each stage—requesting changes for clarity and storytelling, that sort of thing. But you’re also building schedules and chasing after people to get things in on time. Depending on the publisher, you may also be helping out with other administrative tasks and promotion.

Could you talk about your path to becoming a comics editor? What drew you to editing comics versus other career paths with them? (Like writing, drawing, lettering, etc.)

I started out in comics review, and moved into editing when I realized that it combined my creative impulses with my administrative experience. I love to collaborate with creators and to help them create the best comic they can, so editing seemed like the best fit for my interests and skillset!

How did you end up working with TO Comix Press?

When the publisher, Steven Andrews, was looking for assistant editors for Volume 3 of the Toronto Comics Anthology, I was actively looking for more work experience in editing! Part of the mandate at TO Comix Press is to support creators who are early in their careers, so I was able to come on and learn a lot from that experience, so after assistant editing two anthologies, Steven let me lead my own project: Wayward Sisters. It went well, so now we’re working on that project’s spiritual sequel. 

Did the idea for Wayward Kindred come directly from Wayward Sisters, like the name suggests? Or did it originate somewhere else, followed by the realization that it could fit with Wayward Sisters?

I love monsters, so it was inevitable that I’d want to do more anthologies about them. I definitely want to suggest a connection between the two books, but they’re very different! The concept for this one came specifically from reading Nagabe’s gorgeous manga, The Girl from the Other Side, which I was reading while working on Sisters, so I decided that it would make a good follow up, rather than doing a traditional sequel. 

Could you walk us through the process behind developing an anthology like Wayward Kindred?

Well, to keep it short, once you’ve got an idea, coming up with a budget is the next step—that dictates how many stories and creators you can take on. Then you make a timeline. Even for short comics, we try to allow 2-3 weeks for each stage of the process, so you can build back from your target launch date (for us, the Toronto Comic Arts Festival in May). You then can open up for submissions, decide on the line up that would make the strongest book, and get started! Some folks like to do crowdfunding at the beginning of the process, but we like to get that in once we have some gorgeous art to show off. Once the art is all in and edited, you send the proof to the printer, and then fulfill the Kickstarter!

You can learn more about the TO Comix Press method for running anthologies in the articles at our website.

Did you end up pairing unattached writers and artists for Wayward Kindred, like the submissions page said would happen if you received pitches from incomplete creative teams? If so, how did you approach matching artists to writers?

We always accept unpaired pitches at TO Comix Press! It’s part of helping creators with fewer print credits find a place to get published. We go through all of the artist submissions and try to decide which portfolios would bring out the best in the pitched story. Often that means looking for similar stories in the artist’s portfolio, but this is a sense that comes from experience looking and reading many, many comics. Reading comics is the best way to get started in making them!

What have you enjoyed most about editing Wayward Kindred?

It’s always so exciting to see stories come together, especially after months of working with creators. We’re getting letters in now, and I can imagine how the readers are going to feel when they have the stories in front of them, and that’s always a thrill for me.

TO Comix Press has previously held Kickstarter campaigns for other publishing projects. How do you approach crowdfunding for a publication?

We’ve got an article about this on the TO Comix website as well! We’ve found that Twitter is always a major source of income for our Kickstarters, so we do everything we can to get folks talking about the campaign on Twitter. 

What draws you to monsters as characters and a source of storytelling?

I’m interested in monsters’ versatility as metaphor. They can stand in for any taboo you can think of, for any kind of outcast figure, for any kind of cultural anxiety—there are so many rich opportunities for storytelling! 

Wayward Kindred is a spiritual successor to Wayward Sisters.
“Forked” by Seungwoo Baek, Grayson Lee, Cam Lopez and Nikki Powers

Do you have any favorite monsters? Like werewolves, dragons, etc.?

Werewolves are my favourite, I just think they’re very cool. For more specific monster stories, I love Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, an early example of a sympathetic monster. I enjoy scary monsters, but I love a sad monster the most—that’s probably part of why I love werewolves, too. 

You’re also editing AFTERLIFT for comiXology. What is it like editing for a company like comiXology versus a publisher like TO Comix Press?

Editing a series has fewer moving parts than an anthology, so I like that. In an anthology, you’re editing many more pages, and wrangling many more creators, which can get a bit chaotic. A series is nice because you have a smaller team (on AFTERLIFT, it’s a team of only 4!), so it’s easier to keep track of. Then again, a series usually has a more rigid release schedule, which adds pressure, so they both have their pros and cons. 

Do you have advice for anyone interested in editing comics? 

If you want to edit, I’d say the same thing I say to any creators getting their start: networking is key! If you can’t meet people in person, then join Facebook groups, or forums online, find other folks who are hoping to learn as they go alongside you, and your careers can also grow together. 

If you’re looking to edit and you don’t have a portfolio with comics experience (or editorial experience in a different medium), publishing reviews on a blog is a great way to show folks that you know and understand comics. You can also show that you can keep things on a schedule if you publish reviews on a regular basis. I got my early editorial experience editing at pop culture websites, which wasn’t exactly the same as editing comics, but got me started on scheduling and keeping on top of writers. 

Is there anything else you’d like to say about Wayward Kindred?

I’m so excited about this anthology, and I hope that the readers love it as much as we do!

Thanks again for taking the time to chat. Good luck with Wayward Kindred and your other projects!

Wayward Kindred recently met its Kickstarter goal, but there are a few days left to raise more funds and pre-order a copy. The anthology is available to backers for a minimum of $15 as a digital download. Higher reward tiers include a physical copy and prints.

TO Comix Press advocates for transparency, and they have shared reports explaining how funds were used for a selection of their previous publications: Wayward Sisters, Shout Out, Yonge At Heart, and Toronto Comics: Volume 3.

Wayward Kindred is scheduled for release in May 2020.

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Artist Boya Sun Talks Teamwork in ‘5 Worlds’ and ‘Chasma Knights’

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Five Worlds

This year’s DesignerCon serves as another reminder of how much it’s grown. Originally called Vinyl Toy Network, it now includes a wide variety of art and design, with exhibiting booths for various kinds of 3D and 2D art like sculpture, plush toys, prints, clothing, and books. Among them was Boya Sun, one of the artists behind the 5 Worlds graphic novel series. Sun’s booth featured his work in the form of small sculptures, riso prints, enamel pins, stickers, zines, and copies of 5 Worlds, as well as a slim concept book for the graphic novel series.

While at his art-filled booth, Sun took the time to chat with Goomba Stomp about his work in comics and collaborating with others.

5-Way Collaboration in 5 Worlds

Starting 5 Worlds after graduation, Sun feels that working on the series has made him better at comics.

Described as a mix of Avatar: The Last Airbender and Star Wars, 5 Worlds follows a star athlete, a boy from the slums, and a clumsy Sand Dancer Academy student while their worlds are plunged into peril.

“They have three books out right now,” Sun says. He adds that the series will contain five books in total.

With five impending volumes in a series called 5 Worlds, it’s fitting that the main creative team behind it is a 5-person band: Sun, his fellow artists (and former classmates) Xanthe Bouma and Matt Rockefeller, and writers Alexis and Mark Siegel.

Excerpt from 5 Worlds Book 3: The Red Maze.

Sun shares that 5 Worlds started with the Siegel siblings, recounting how they were looking for illustrators. They ultimately found Bouma, Rockefeller, and Sun, and then sent them the story bible. 

Describing their working relationship as a “5-way collaboration” of artists and writers, Sun is grateful for the partnership.

“It takes the stress away,” Sun says. He explains that if he’s weaker in an area, his teammates can come and help.

Unifying the Art

Sun further explains the art process behind 5 Worlds. Since the series is rooted in fantasy and worldbuilding, he and the other artists start with a few months devoted to concept art and sketches that cover aspects like different planets and new costumes. 

When designs are finalized, the art team splits the script evenly, and each of them gets a section to pencil.

“Our styles work pretty well with each other,” Sun says.

Excerpt from 5 Worlds Concept Book 3, which features development art for Book 3: The Red Maze. It’s available for purchase on Boya Sun’s website.

Sun also praises Rockefeller for inking all the pencil drawings, making them look “seamless” and more unified. Bouma and Sun handle coloring together.

While the concept art for 5 Worlds is often a mix of traditional and digital work, Sun says it’s different for pencilling, inking, and coloring. 

“The final production’s all digital,” he says. Sun adds that making a 5 Worlds book can take about 9-10 months. The team tries to create one book per year.  

5 Worlds poster by Sun. 

Refining Ideas on Chasma Knights

Sun worked on another graphic novel with a smaller team: just him and writer Kate Reed Petty. Together they made Chasma Knights, a tale about living toys that can fuse with people and grant them new powers.

For Chasma Knights, it started with Sun. He had the original idea, and tried to develop it for a TV show or a book. But at the time, Sun was busy with other projects, and he felt less experienced with writing.

Mark Siegel, also founding editorial and creative director of First Second Books, helped Sun with early development on Chasma Knights. Sun says that since they already had a working relationship through their collaboration on 5 Worlds, Mark Siegel was interested in more of his projects. (Sun remarks that while working on 5 Worlds can be time-consuming, it isn’t a full-time assignment, and he can do other projects too.) Mark Siegel ended up connecting Sun with Petty for help on writing Chasma Knights, and later First Second published it. (5 Worlds is published by Penguin Random House.)

“She was very receptive of my ideas in the collaboration,” says Sun when recalling his partnership with Petty. He adds that Chasma Knights had topics that interested both of them.

Working with a writer like Petty had been enjoyable for Sun. He says that he presented his ideas to her, and she “took them, digested them.” When he had been on his own, he found it hard to narrow down ideas. In contrast, Sun found it helpful to talk things through with a writer.

Although they finalized the plot together, Sun says much of the world of Chasma Knights was invented after the scripting stage, when it was time for him to illustrate it.

Excerpt from Chasma Knights by Boya Sun and Kate Reed Petty.

While Petty hinted on her website that she has a new project with First Second, Sun shares that he’s developing a pitch for a graphic novel that he intends to write and illustrate by himself. Of course, this is going on while he continues to work on 5 Worlds. Sun says that the fourth book of the series will launch in May 2020

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