Connect with us

Blog

The Making of Taika Waititi’s ‘Jojo Rabbit’

Published

on

Described as “an anti-hate satire,” Jojo Rabbit follows a lonely German boy (Roman Griffin Davis) whose world view is turned upside down when he discovers his single mother (Scarlett Johansson) is hiding a young Jewish girl (Thomasin McKenzie) in their attic. Aided only by his imaginary friend, Adolf Hitler (Taika Waititi), Jojo must confront his blind nationalism.

Ever since the satirical black comedy had its world premiere at the 44th Toronto International Film Festival (where it won the top prize), critics have weighed in on why they love or dislike the movie. Needless to say, Jojo Rabbit is certainly a divisive film and judging by Rotten Tomatoes, the more reviews released, the more the Tomatometer score drops.

As Jojo Rabbit makes its theatrical debut this week, 20th Century Fox has released a behind-the-scenes making-of featurette that addresses the biggest criticisms lobbied at the film— and regardless of your opinion, the featurette is well worth watching to understand Waititi’s direction.

“I wanted to make sure that it didn’t just seem like I was making a weird comedy amongst a really traumatic, violent, and tumultuous time period in history,” Waititi says in the featurette. “It’s really easy to get caught up in this idea that you’re entertaining people with laughs and ridiculous moments. I just had to make sure that I wasn’t letting that get the better of the story and take over essentially what was the main message which is we need to be more tolerant, and spread more love and less hate.”

Check out the video below and while you’re here, set aside some time to read our review of the film.

Some people take my heart, others take my shoes, and some take me home. I write, I blog, I podcast, I edit, and I design websites. Founder and Editor-in-Chief of Goomba Stomp and the NXpress Nintendo Podcast. Former Editor-In-Chief of Sound On Sight, and host of several podcasts including the Game of Thrones and Walking Dead podcasts, as well as the Sound On Sight and Sordid Cinema shows.

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

We update daily. Support our site by simply following us on Twitter and Facebook

Facebook

Trending