Connect with us

Sundance Film Festival

Sundance 2020: ‘The Nowhere Inn’ Is a Toothless Tale of Musical Madness

St. Vincent and Carrie Brownstein’s film isn’t committed enough to craziness to make a good midnight movie or funny enough to be worth your time.

Published

on

The Nowhere Inn

The term “midnight movie” is somewhat amorphous; it can include everything from legitimately great films (EraserheadThe Rocky Horror Picture ShowNight of the Living Dead) to utterly terrible films (The Room, a variety of low-budget horror standbys). What brings these high and low cultural artifacts together is a lack of concern about taste. They’re transgressive, extreme, sometimes thought-provoking — by the end, you might feel as if your heart is about to crack through your ribcage, or you’ll be embarrassed at the thought of anyone noticing just how hard you laughed. It’s unlikely that anyone will experience any of these feelings by the end of the St. Vincent and Carrie Brownstein–starring The Nowhere Inn, a midnight movie in aspiration only that’s neither extreme enough to shock nor funny enough to delight.

The Nowhere Inn begins earnestly enough as a pseudo-documentary purportedly directed by Brownstein, now expanding her many talents to include directing (she’s also the lead guitarist of the seminal rock band Sleater-Kinney and best known as an actor for her work opposite Fred Armisen on Portlandia). Her subject is her friend, singer and fellow guitar virtuoso St. Vincent (Annie Clark), who’s on tour supporting her critically acclaimed album Masseduction (2017). Early on, Brownstein imagines her documentary to be a mix of concert footage and revealing behind-the-scenes moments, but her dictate to “be yourself” backfires when it turns out that Clark doesn’t do or say anything that exciting off stage. The footage is mostly ab workouts and discussions of how her bandmates like to eat radishes and anything that “tastes like dirt.” It’s only when Brownstein urges her friend to be more interesting off stage that the film begins to take shape — and reveals its biggest failings.

Hoping to please her friend, Clark adopts her St. Vincent persona full-time, becoming a chic rocker ice queen. But it’s not just her practiced aloofness; she hires actors to play her family because she doesn’t want to speak about her real father, who went to prison in 2010 for fraud. She also plays up her relationship with Dakota Johnson, playing a hilarious version of herself, presumably inspired by Clark’s real-life relationship with Kristen Stewart. But all of her deceptions seem designed less to make her seem more interesting in the film than to drive Brownstein insane.

Clark and Brownstein have said their film (which is directed by Brownstein’s Portlandia collaborator Bill Benz) is inspired by Donald Cammell and Nicolas Roeg’s Performance (1970) about a rocker who begins to influence and warp a gangster who’s holed up with him. It’s not a hard connection to make, but there’s none of Performance’s menace in The Nowhere Inn. Every moment in which it might finally tip into madness is undercut by lukewarm humor that generates modest chuckles at best. Clark is fitfully convincing as an actress, but she pulls back when she needs to go big. Brownstein is a more compelling figure, but she’s stuck playing the straight woman for most of the film, which doesn’t give her comedic talents room to flourish. The two are legitimately hilarious in their few scenes with Johnson, who’s totally committed to the cameo part, but most of The Nowhere Inn feels like a slog. The film was always intended to be fully scripted (written by Clark and Brownstein), but by the end, I wished they would have taken the on-screen Brownstein’s advice and just made it into a concert film. There’s nothing in The Nowhere Inn that lives up to St. Vincent simply rocking out on stage with her guitar.

The Sundance Film Festival runs Jan. 23 – Feb. 2, 2020. Visit the official website for more information.

Brian Marks is Sordid Cinema's Lead Film Critic. His writing has appeared in The Village Voice, LA Weekly, The Los Angeles Times, and Ampersand. He's a graduate of USC's master's program in Specialized Arts Journalism. You can find more of his writing at InPraiseofCinema.com. Best film experience: driving halfway across the the country for a screening of Jean-Luc Godard's "King Lear." Totally worth it.

1 Comment

1 Comment

  1. Donna Lattanzio

    January 28, 2020 at 6:01 am

    Watch Johnson in Ben & Kate. She is really funny. Series gone too soon!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Sundance Film Festival

‘Relic’ Weaponizes Our Fears of Aging Alone

The debut feature from Natalie Erika James is an elegant and chilling horror film about dementia and losing a loved one.

Published

on

Relic

Of all the longstanding horror tropes, few are as resilient as that of the horrifying elderly person. Of course, there shouldn’t be anything scary about old people (most of us will be there soon enough), but we sense the decay that has overtaken them and know that it will eventually come for us, too. Seniors have also had far more experiences than young people, and their depths of knowledge are imposing. They know more of the horrors of the world then younger generations have been able to experience, and sometimes they turn those evils against them. It would have been easy for Natalie Erika James to make Relic, her debut feature, something that played on that well-worn territory for some cheap scares. Instead, she has crafted a subtle and terrifying film graced with a welcome strain of tenderness.

Relic stars Emily Mortimer as Kay, who learns in the film’s opening minutes that her mother Edna (Robyn Nevin) hasn’t been seen or heard from by the neighbors in quite some time. She and her improbably old daughter Sam (Bella Heathcote) drive from Melbourne to her country house to find the place empty and showing signs of disrepair. Furniture and items have been left in disarray, there’s food left out for a pet that’s been dead for years, and there are post-it notes everywhere with reminders for the simplest tasks. Kay and Sam put their lives on hold to stay in the house while the police search for Edna, but strange goings-on in underlit rooms suggest something closer to home might account for her disappearance.

Relic

The scary old house would be a perfect opportunity for copious jump scares, but James keeps Relic admirably free of such cheap thrills. There are a few, to be sure, and plenty of terrifying moments, but she doesn’t feel the need to punctuate them with crashing sounds loud enough to make you involuntarily shudder, like a doctor’s hammer to the knee. Instead, she builds an ever-mounting sense of dread that begins to envelop Kay and Sam. Much of that is accomplished by the excellent production design by Steven Jones-Evans, who has decorated the house to feel both lived in yet mysterious. Part of its disorienting nature is also due to the layout, which never quite makes sense; it’s difficult to tell which rooms are on the second floor, and the audience is never quite sure which room one of the characters will end up in when they pass through a door.

Relic is more than just a great haunted house movie, though. As Kay and Sam are driven closer together by their fears for Edna, the audience is able to confront its fears: of death, of old age, of losing our memories, of dying alone with no loved ones to care for us in our final moments. The movie takes some bizarre turns as it hurtles toward its climax, but Relic ends on an unexpectedly moving note (if still chilling). After your nerves have settled, you might just want to give your parent or grandparent a call.

Editor’s Note: This article was originally published on January 29, 2020, as part of our coverage of the Sundance Film Festival.

Continue Reading

Sundance Film Festival

Sundance 2020: ‘The Night House’ Finds New Life in the Maligned Jump Scare

‘The Night House’ evolves from a simple haunted house story to a chilling examination of grief, with plenty of spooky noises along the way.

Published

on

The Night House

I’m on the record as not being a fan of jump scares — those moments when a movie signals that we’re supposed to be scared by using such a loud sound that we involuntarily shudder. They’re the ultimate form of shocked surprise, but too often, filmmakers use them as a means of misdirection. When they’ve failed to create a suspenseful atmosphere via the screenplay or the visual ambiance, they add a deafening door slam or a bump in the night or a gasp that registers as loud as a scream to make viewers involuntarily spasm. Something legitimately frightening that’s given an extra soundtrack boost is one thing, but more often the jump scares are paired with completely innocuous events to set us on edge when there’s no reason for our defenses to be aroused. It was clear from the opening minutes of The Night House that the film would use jump scares liberally. In fact, it’s a movie that lives or dies by them. But, miraculously, The Night House finds original and legitimately terrifying uses for its sometimes deafening sound. I’d hate to go home to an old, creaky house after seeing it, but few movies in recent years have set me this much on edge.

If The Night House embraces the jump scare, one trend it thankfully ignores is the need to find frights from the very beginning. Instead, it opens on a somber note with downbeat — but not depressing — music. Beth (Rebecca Hall) is obsessively going through keepsakes and old home videos. It soon becomes clear that her husband has killed himself, but we first meet Beth once she’s past the earliest stages of grief. Now, her sadness has lifted a bit and become intertwined with anger at the way he left her alone so suddenly. She’s a grade-school teacher and who lives in an elegant and spacious home on a lake hidden away in the woods, which we later learn was completely built by hand by her husband. But just as Beth is attempting to regain a sense of normalcy, something begins to act up in the house. She hears banging with no obvious source, and the automatic lights turn on outside and hints of figures are glimpsed, but nothing concrete. Things escalate when she’s awoken in the middle of the night by the stereo in the living room downstairs turning on and spontaneously playing her wedding song at full blast.

The Night House’s director, David Bruckner, handles these developments carefully and delicately. Though his jump scares are initially stimuli without meaning, they begin to accumulate, and we start to discover the secrets hidden in Beth’s house, some of them left by her husband. Though it’s a respectable haunted house film in many ways, The Night House begins to teeter on the edge of cosmic horror as it progresses, and the massive scope of the horrors it suggests is nearly overwhelming. Hall is the perfect choice for the film; she has a calming presence, and even her voice is soothing, and she’s able to stay calm initially, but once she finally lets loose, full-on panic sets in.

The Night House descends from bumps into the night to a constant state of terror, but what ultimately makes it so powerful is the sense of real emotion. Beth’s husband is mostly a cipher, but she reveals home important their relationship was, and just how alone she feels without him. The film’s nihilistic tendencies are abated just enough by her humanity. The Night House will get your adrenaline pumping, but it won’t leave a sour taste in your mouth.

The Sundance Film Festival runs Jan. 23 – Feb. 2, 2020. Visit the official website for more information.

Continue Reading

Sundance Film Festival

Sundance 2020: ‘Never Rarely Sometimes Always’ Is More Than a Simple Polemical

Eliz Hittman’s ‘Never Rarely Sometimes Always’ explores the humiliations and obstacles that block women’s paths to abortion throughout the US.

Published

on

Never Rarely Sometimes Always

The early buzz out of Sundance was largely positive about Eliza Hittman’s third film, Never Rarely Sometimes Always, but some critics misjudged the work as a mostly political examination of hot button social issues. They’re not totally off the mark, as Hittman’s viewpoint is clear and undisguised, but her film is a sensitive and moving look at the experiences of young women in need of an abortion in the United States rather than a form of propaganda.

The film opens on a talent show with a parade of singing groups, but the pattern is disrupted when we first see Autumn (Sidney Flanigan). She’s singing an angsty rock song solo and accompanying herself on guitar. It immediately sets her apart from the crowd; the self-penned song betrays her inner anger at how she’s treated, and the fact that she’s the only person playing an instrument suggests she’s resourceful and adaptable. The fact that she’s even willing to sing sometime that departs so extremely from the poppy nature of the other acts indicates how desperate she is to break out of the social constraints that bind her.

Never Rarely Sometimes Always indicates the position Autumn is in early, when a boy in the audience calls her a slut in the middle of her performance, temporarily derailing the song, though she’s able to resume and finish it. Hittman doesn’t give anything in the way of backstory, but it’s clear from the outburst and the shifty way other guys look at her after the talent show that she’s being shamed for some kind of sexual encounter. The consequences of said encounter are also clear when Autumn skips school one day to go to a clinic for a pregnancy test, which turns out to be positive. Though she doesn’t realize it, the place she has gone for the test is a “crisis pregnancy center,” an organization that seeks to dissuade women from getting abortions, often through disinformation. Autumn is 17 and still in high school, and she knows she can’t take care of a baby or even bring one to term without sacrificing her future, so she looks up how to obtain an abortion. That’s where things get complicated. She’s 17, and minors in Pennsylvania can’t get an abortion without parental consent, something she might not get. So she skips out on school and work shortly afterward to take a bus to New York with her cousin Skylar (Talia Ryder) in search of one.

That might seem like the end of her journey, but Never Rarely Sometimes Always finds obstacle after obstacle that seemingly conspire to stop Autumn from getting an abortion, whether legal, financial, or social. Some viewers might find Autumn’s trials and tribulations to be a bit much, but that betrays their own disconnect from something that’s shockingly immediate to many women. After my screening of the film, Hittman revealed that much of Autumn’s experience navigating clinics and Planned Parenthoods was based on her own research long before filming began. She traveled to multiple different centers and played the part of a pregnant woman, or someone who thought she might be pregnant, in order to see how the different employees treated her, what options they offered, and in what ways they stymied her. One of the counselors that Hittman found particularly helpful and soothing even appears in the film in a marvelously empathetic role.

Hittman largely follows Robert Bresson’s precept that filmmakers should use non-professional actors in order to extract a life-like and spontaneous performance. With Flanigan, she’s found a miraculous newcomer, an actor so good that she makes it hard to believe she hasn’t been in movies before. Ryder is a more professional actor, but she also has a wonderful realness to her performance and incredible chemistry with Flanigan, so much so that I assumed she was also a non-professional (in the best way possible). Hittman could easily have made Never Rarely Sometimes Always as a documentary, but her lead actress are so good that they help make the story even more personal for viewers. Not everyone needs a way in, and plenty of women will have gone through exactly what Autumn does here, but it’s impossible not to be moved by her plight and the way she transcends it.

The Sundance Film Festival runs Jan. 23 – Feb. 2, 2020. Visit the official website for more information.

Continue Reading

We update daily. Support our site by simply following us on Twitter and Facebook

Facebook

Trending