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Sordid Cinema Podcast

Sordid Cinema Podcast #532: TIFF 2017 Round Table Discussion

This week, Simon is joined by new contributor Chelsea Phillips-Carr and returning former co-host Edgar Chaput to break down what everyone caught at this year’s Toronto International Film Festival, as well as to discuss the phenomenon of the festival more broadly. Movies touched on include: a particularly gnarly cannibal documentary, the latest from Paul Schrader, and films by Agnes Varda, Michael Hazavinicus, Agnes Varda, Armando Iannucci, Lucrecia Martel, and many more.

For all this and more, tune in and have a listen!

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Written By

Launched in 2007, Sordid Cinema is one of the longest-running film podcasts. Following a long absence (let’s call it an extended break), Ricky D is back on the Sordid Cinema beat, accompanied by his new co-host, Patrick Murphy. The Sordid Cinema Podcast makes its return, with a new format that sees hosts Ricky D and Patrick Murphy discussing some of our favorite genre films over the years that may have flown under the radar for some audiences. This new version of the long-running show will focus more on discussion and less, on reviews, as we hope to examine the selections from a multitude of angles and break down what makes these films so special. Brought to you by the former editors of Sound on Sight, Sordid Cinema is Goomba Stomp’s Film and TV section and a leading source of movie reviews, and discussion from the world of international, independent, cult and genre cinema. We cover film festivals around the world including Cannes, TIFF, Fantasia, NYFF, Tribeca, Fantastic Fest, SXSW, FNC, Venice, Berlin, and more.

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