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Counter Attack #4: Ranking The E3 2018 Conferences

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E3 2018

Counter Attack is a weekly feature here on Goomba Stomp in which John Cal McCormick casts a bemused eye over the gaming news, the niggling issues plaguing the industry, important moments from gaming’s past, or whatever it is that’s annoying him this week. Today we’ll be ranking each conference from E3 2018 from worst to best, because what would E3 be without arbitrarily declaring which corporation did the best job of peddling their wares?

E3, like Christmas, comes but once a year. And E3, like Christmas, can be a bit of a mixed bag. You never know whether the surprise presents you’re opening are going to be a brand new remote controlled helicopter or another pair of novelty socks. Well, I suppose in that instance you would, unless for some reason your aunt put the same novelty socks she buys you every year in a massive box to throw you off the scent. Who knows? The point of this increasingly laboured analogy is that it’s the unknown that makes E3 so exciting, and it’s the failure to deliver on every single one of our ludicrous expectations that so frequently makes the expo so disappointing for many people. Expectations need to be tempered. Don’t go in expecting Half Life 3 and 4 to be announced back to back, and maybe you can appreciate what does get shown.

That said, 2018 was not a vintage year for E3. Perhaps we’ve just been spoiled in recent years, but this was for my money one of the dullest E3s in many a moon. It wasn’t a car crash by any means, and there were no conferences that came close to, say, Sony’s 2006 presser, and there were no awkward moments on par with Jamie Kennedy’s train-wreck presenting job. But there was certainly no runaway “winner” in terms of the conferences this year, with most being good and bad in different ways. Still, that’s not going to stop us from ranking them from worst to best for your reading pleasure. So let’s talk about how E3 2018 went down, who walked the walked, who talked the talk, and who officially won at trying to get you to buy video games.

Also, we won’t be covering the PC show here. I’m sure Microsoft Word looks great again this year, but I didn’t watch it. If you desperately need to know about Steam, and Minesweeper, and Powerpoint presentations, then we did a rundown and it’s right here.

On with the ranking.

#7 As Always, It’s EA’s Conference Bringing Up The Rear

This bizarre interview with Vince Zampella yielded very little information about Respawn’s upcoming Star Wars game.

Host Andrea Rene did her best to look excited while Electronic Arts paraded the usual array of sports games we see every year, but I wasn’t buying it. I knew she felt dead inside, just like I did watching it. I can’t think of any game that needs to be at E3 less than FIFA. You could do a social experiment where EA do an E3 and they don’t show FIFA, they don’t talk about FIFA, in fact, FIFA might as well be Lord Voldemort – it doesn’t even get mentioned by name on stage under threat of murder. And if this hypothetical, FIFA-less EA conference went down, I guarantee you that FIFA would sell exactly the same number of copies as it always does upon release.

FIFA, Madden, whatever that basketball thing was where the man was throwing the orange ball around – if you’re into them you’re into them and you’re going to buy them, you know you’re going to buy them, and some dude pretending to be having some sort of religious experience because he’s stood six feet away from the Champion’s League trophy isn’t going to change that fact one iota. And I’m not one of those cognac quaffing, french cigarette smoking snoots looking down their nose on sports games. I like FIFA. And, you know, wrestling games. And golf games but only the silly ones like Mario Golf. It’s just that these games simply don’t matter at E3 and only slow the proceedings down. Know your audience. Speaking of which, don’t bother showing off mobile games either.

Away from sports and mobile, EA shed a little light on Respawn’s Star Wars game during a weird and cringey interview with Vince Zampella, and surprise announced a sequel to Unravel, which is the game they published to try and convince gamers that they’re not as awful as everyone says. Then they came out on stage and apologised for being as awful as everyone says. Actually, it wasn’t so much an apology. It was like when Louis CK got fingered for the #MeToo thing, and he kinda acknowledged it was all true and he sucked as a person, but he didn’t quite throw himself on the mercy of the court. A nonpology, I think they called it. Battlefield II was a shitshow, and they’re trying to sort it out. And so it’s good that they’re acknowledging their shortcomings. But hey, here’s some micro-transactions for you in Anthem.

Oh goody. Another always online multiplayer space shooter. We probably need more of those.

I’m finding hard it to get excited about Anthem, by the way. It reminds me of when Bungie took Halo – a series with rich lore and refined first person shooting – took the latter, ditched the former, and turned it into cold, clinical, lifeless, always online, money spinning grindathon Destiny. I played Destiny and enjoyed it in a boring sort of way, but that doesn’t mean I can’t accept what it was. Anthem looks like that, but built on the back of Mass Effect‘s festering corpse rather than Halo‘s. Hopefully, I’m wrong on that one, but either way, one pretty alright looking game wasn’t enough to save this conference from being a lame duck.

I honestly can’t remember a time when EA didn’t have the worst press conference at E3. They’re the undefeated, back to back world heavyweight champions of having the shittest presser on the biggest stage in gaming, and once again I find myself asking, why does EA even need a press conference? Seriously, why do you need a press conference, EA? If they ditched this conference and had Anthem on stage at Xbox or PlayStation it would probably help the game get over since more people would be watching, and I honestly don’t think it would hurt the sales of any of their other games at all. Give it up.

#6 Square Enix’s Best Quality Was Brevity

Square Enix had a lot of exciting things to show at E3 2018.

Square Enix’s conference bests EA’s only – and I mean only – because it was half as long. This was a massive waste of time, and anybody who actually sat and watched it all should legally be able to send an invoice to Square Enix to get a monetary settlement for that time back.

The problem here – and again, I find myself asking, does Square Enix even need a conference for this? – is that they had absolutely nothing to announce, and so it seemed like they were having the press conference because someone had accidentally booked it and they didn’t have the heart to say no to turning up. It was like they remembered on the morning that they had to show something, so they got an office junior to just group a bunch of their old trailers together using Microsoft Movie Maker while the rest of the studio went out for Cosmopolitans. It was a bunch of trailers that we’d already seen – some at other conferences at the same E3 – and precious little in terms of new information.

Shadow of the Tomb Raider looks fine but we’d already seen it. There’s some sort of Final Fantasy XIV and Monster Hunter crossover happening. Final Fantasy VII Remake is just a thing that we now talk about in the same way that we talk about leprechauns and other mythical shit that nobody has laid eyes on but a few nutters swear actually exists. Just Cause is still going after the somewhat botched launch of Just Cause 3, and this time there’s storms and stuff so that looks pretty cool, but again, we’d already seen the trailer.

Kingdom Hearts III has a release date, but until the game is actually physically in my hand, and I’ve opened the box to make sure that there’s not just an IOU inside I won’t believe it’s coming out in January 2019. Also, the Kingdom Hearts III trailer was awful. I thought the sound was just boinked when the trailer was shown the first time at the Microsoft conference, but no, apparently it was designed that way. Also the Gummi Ship is back so I guess that’s something to look forward to. You can’t always sell the sarcasm in prose, so I’m just going to have to spell it out that I fucking hate the Gummi Ship in Kingdom Hearts. And I had no idea who like three quarters of the people were in the trailer. I know that’s my own fault for not playing the 7,000 Kingdom Hearts spin-off games, but I tried one of them once and it was properly shit. Imagine how Xbox One players feel. I felt for sure Square Enix would announce the first two Kingdom Hearts games would be coming to Xbox, but they didn’t. Good luck starting with III. It’ll be like trying to learn Japanese by listening to Mr. Roboto by Styx over and over again for forty hours.

#5 Nintendo’s Near Future Looks Bleak

Super Smash Bros. Ultimate features every single fighter ever to appear in Smash. Let’s list them all one at a time!

This Nintendo Direct – which isn’t a conference, but then if they’re going to show it at E3, why not include it? – was not one for the ages, but if you’re a big Smash Bros. fan then you’ll at least get a kick out of all the stuff they showed off for the latest Nintendo beat ’em up.

First, the non-Smash stuff.

Okay, that’s over with.

Only kidding. But seriously, if you don’t like Smash you’re kinda fucked on Switch this year. Mario Party is coming, and it looks like it makes quite novel use of the Switch itself. That’s fine if you like party games, and you have loads of cool friends who all like to hang out and play Switch together instead of drinking themselves into a blackout at parties like normal people, but it’s in the October big game slot, which is disappointing for anyone hoping for a robust single player experience this year.

There’s DLC coming for Xenoblade Chronicles 2, which is great if you’re still interested in Xenoblade Chronicles. Daemon x Machina is a new Switch game that looks a bit like Zone of the Enders, not because it’s about mech suits blowing each other up but because it looks like a PS2 game. Fortnite is on Switch now, but the most exciting thing about this announcement was that it has its own voice chat system that doesn’t use Nintendo’s fucking dreadful mobile phone app, so maybe other games will follow suit going forward and one day we’ll look back on the app and laugh, like we do with those telephones that you had to manually dial, penny farthing bicycles, and motion controls.

Speaking of motion controls, we got another look at the answer to the question that nobody asked, Pokemon Let’s Go Pikachu! and the other one. All jokes aside, the games do look lovely graphically, and perhaps they’ll be fun to play, and revisiting the Kanto region in glorious, beautiful HD is an alluring prospect, but I’d be lying to you if I said that Pokemon‘s first appearance on Switch doesn’t look like a bit of a damp squid to me. I don’t see how replacing the combat of more traditional Pokemon games with an arm waving mechanic like it’s 2007 is really going to make for an entertaining game, but I’m ready to be proven wrong because I love me a Pokemon. Maybe I’ll buy it and get an arm workout. Oh, and by the way, including Mew as an exclusive Pokemon for buying that stupid Pokeball version of Let’s Go! is a dick move. It’s the sort of thing that we’d be up in arms about if it was EA or Activision, but it’s Nintendo so I’m sure we’ll find some way to twist it into a positive.

On the plus side I still haven’t played Donkey Kong Tropical Freeze, Mario + Rabbids, or Xenoblade Chronicles 2, so I’m okay for a while.

The rest of the show was dedicated to Super Smash Bros. Ultimate, which looks like the Wii U game with a few tweaks and more fighters, but then what does that matter since they did a stellar job with Smash on Wii U? How much you enjoyed this segment will likely depend on how much you love Smash Bros., but I suspect that even the most dedicated members of the Nintendo Defence Force will concede that this went on for too long. Did we really need to get into the minutia of practically every character in the game, the stages, and the special attacks? Having every Smash fighter ever in one game is rad and all, but seriously, by the end, after listing fighter after fighter after fighter after fighter, it was like that time Chris Jericho read out his list of 1,004 wrestling holds on WCW Nitro. Trim it down, man.

The biggest takeaway from this Nintendo Direct was that 2018 does not look like a fantastic year for Switch. It’s only year two so that’s not exactly unheard of for a console, but after coming out of the blocks with Zelda and Mario in the first year the console was on the market, anyone hoping for Nintendo to keep up that momentum is surely disappointed by what was shown here. There was nary a mention of Metroid Prime 4, nothing about classics coming to Switch, and no update on the roundly mocked online service coming later in the year. This was Smash, Smash, Smash, and if you don’t like Smash, then I hope you’ve got another console under your television to tide you over.

#4 Bethesda Made The Best Of A Bad Job

Oh look, it’s the decomposing corpse of the Fallout series.

Bethesda had a hard job to do and I think they mostly pulled it off, but it was far from perfect. Fallout 76 is a tough sell to a lot of people. Taking a traditionally single player, story driven role playing game series and then trying to convince fans of that series that they should play an always online, multiplayer survival game set in the same universe is not easy. I know, because I’m one of those fans and I was sick in my mouth when I heard the words, “online multiplayer.” Bethesda wisely knew that many of their fans would be up in arms about the direction they’re taking with Fallout 76, and so they addressed the elephant in the room head on, trying to put across exactly what they were going for. While I wouldn’t say this was entirely successful – I can’t say I’m exactly champing at the bit to get blown up and then teabagged by WombRaider69 when I could be questing on my own – but I think they did the best they could with what they have.

The rest of their conference was a mixed bag. Andrew WK turned up for some reason, which I’d usually have no issue with but it was all a bit weird as nobody really knew what was going on, and the crowd didn’t look like they were in the party mood. That whole thing felt like it had time travelled from an E3 ten years ago when celebrity cameos and random gigs were a thing that people thought was a good idea for E3. On the plus side, Rage 2 looked like it might be fun, getting the Watch Dogs 2 treatment of taking a drab shooter and giving it loads of attitude. We’ll see how that pans out. While we’re on, Pete Hines made a great joke about Rage 2 having been announced by “our friends at Walmart” referencing the infamous pre-E3 leak that spoiled a number of surprises, so that was nice.

Wolfenstein Youngblood combines two of my favourite things: fucking Nazis up and the 1980s. Of course, in real life the 1980s fucked most of Britain up and it was actually Germany who wound up far more fiscally prosperous, so who’s laughing now?

I was pretty excited to see a teaser for the next Doom game, Doom Eternal, and while this was little more than an announcement of an announcement – more to come at Quakecon, apparently – it was still a welcome surprise. Wolfenstein is getting a spin-off set in the ’80s which sounds right up my street. I just hope I can listen to I Ran by A Flock of Seagulls while I kick Nazis in the ‘nads. They also spent time talking about mobile games – sigh – announcing that Fallout Shelter is coming to PS4 and Switch, but weirdly they didn’t say Xbox One. I’m not sure if that was a slip of the tongue, or if for some reason Xbox isn’t getting it. They’ve made a mobile Elder Scrolls, too, so if you weren’t already totally pissed off with them spending time making an online Fallout instead of the Fallout you want, this probably put the icing on the cake.

Bethesda finished their conference by winning the 2018 Metroid Prime 4 Award, given to studios who are so concerned that they don’t have enough to show off during their E3 conference that they cobble together a four second video to announce that one day that thing you really want might actually happen, despite having nothing to show for it yet.

Bethesda went for a double whammy here, first announcing a game called Starfield – replete with video of space, and something moving through space, and then a screen that said “Starfield” on it. Woah. Then came The Elder Scrolls VI – the first trailer for the much anticipated next game in the RPG series showed some hills, and you could see a bit of sky, and maybe a mountain, and then the words “Elder Scrolls VI” popped up on screen. Not so much as a fucking subtitle for the Elder Scrolls. I tell you, it takes some fucking balls to finish your E3 conference by announcing two games before the consoles that you’ll be playing them on have even been announced, so I suppose we should at least be impressed, in a way. We’ll have to rename the award for next year. Jesus.

#3 Ubisoft Is Kinda Getting Good At Conference Thing

Beyond Good and Evil 2 looks precisely dick like the cult classic that it’s a sequel to.

Historically, Ubisoft has probably had more cringe on stage than any other publisher at E3. It’s not that they make bad games, it’s just that for some reason they generally fail to highlight the positives of their upcoming video games in a way that doesn’t make me want to staple my own eyelids shut out of embarrassment. The last couple of years have been heading in the right direction, but their conferences always tend to get bogged down in unnecessary details, dragging on for too long, and dampening the mood as a result. While there was still some of that this year, for the most part it was well paced, and what they showed off looked good.

Beyond Good and Evil 2 is one of those games that seems to have been hanging around for years, and having seen some bits and pieces of it I do have to question the logic in making a sequel to a cult classic that looks nothing like said classic. It’ll probably wind up Ubified to the point that it bears no resemblance to the original and becomes just another Ubisoft open world, per centage on maps, tower climbing, collectathon, but at least most of what Ubisoft makes is at least quasi-entertaining, so there’s hope for it even if it likely won’t be what fans want.

They spent too long talking about Trials. We all know how Trials works at this point. You ride bikes over impossible courses, fall off, and everyone laughs. Or at least that’s how I play Trials. Badly. A 30 second trailer would have been enough to sell this. We got a peek at Skull and Bones, which just looks like the piratey bits from Assassin’s Creed IV, but since they were the only thing I liked about Assassin’s Creed IV, and the entire series for that matter, I’m marginally more interested in this than I ought to be. Pirates are awesome, we all know that, and since Sea of Thieves seems to have been about as popular as the clap since launching earlier in the year, maybe this’ll be the pirate ’em up we need.

Assassin’s Creed Odyssey is already causing a bit of minor controversy because it lets you play as a gay character if you like, and apparently gay people didn’t exist in ancient Greece.

Assassin’s Creed Odyssey sadly doesn’t feature an ancient assassin with a magical hat that can possess people, and is actually just another Assassin’s Creed game set in Greece. It’s nice to see we’re back to getting annual Assassin’s Creed games after that lengthy one year hiatus. The Division 2 looks pretty good if you like online multiplayer shooters, which of course, I don’t. There’s also The Crew 2 just in case you want to take the standard Ubisoft open world formula in car form. Oh, and they’ve got an upcoming space shooter called Starlink, and if you buy it on Switch you get Fox McCloud as a bonus character which is rad. If you squint your eyes it’ll be like you’re playing the Star Fox game you wish Nintendo had given us instead of that motion controlled abortion on Wii U.

I can’t say that I was personally thrilled about much of what Ubisoft showed off, but their conference was punchy with little in the way of down time or awkwardness, they did a good job of selling everything, and they actually had some stuff to show off which made a pleasant change from most of the other pressers on this list so far.

#2 Sony Had The Best And Worst Conference Of 2018

If Assassin’s Creed Odyssey having optional homosexual romances is pissing off the dregs of the Internet, then here’s The Last of Us Part II featuring a gay woman protagonist to really rub salt into man-baby wounds.

Honestly, you couldn’t make this up. Sony had wisely announced prior to E3 that rather than having a traditional conference they’d be taking a deeper look at four of their biggest upcoming games, almost certainly because they knew they didn’t have much to show off and they wanted to avoid upsetting their fanbase who now expect every conference to be more explosive than a Bond movie after the superlative pressers in 2015 and 2016. So what they actually did was build a tent to look like the interior of a church – which we later found out was in reference to a location in The Last of Us Part II, but was very confusing at first – and then after showing off ten minutes of the next Naughty Dog game, had a fifteen minute intermission while they moved everybody to the next location for the rest of the show. They had a presenter stalling for time while the audience was on the move, and the whole thing was bizarre, and incredibly awkward.

I’m writing this out now, and it only happened a day ago, and I’m still not convinced I’m not making the whole thing up as part of some sort of acid flashback. Did this actually happen? Have I finally lost my fucking marbles? Answers on a postcard please.

If we were ranking conferences based on the first twenty minutes alone, Sony’s would be the worst since 2006. It was so poorly conceived that you can’t even comprehend how whoever came up with the idea wasn’t immediately popped into a cannon and fired directly into the sea by Sony top brass. Who has fifteen minutes of a conference, then takes a little break, then carries on with the conference? Absolute madness. But as it happens we don’t rank conferences based on the first third alone – we look at the bigger picture – and once the show got going again business really picked up.

First of all, The Last of Us Part II looks incredible. The production values of the game are insane, the animations look to be some of the best ever seen in a video game, and it managed to be sugary sweet and violent as all hell in the space of about four seconds. If you’re not a fan of Naughty Dog’s brand of video game storytelling then it doesn’t look like the next episode of The Last of Us will change that, but for everyone else this is definitely one to watch. After the fantastic The Last of Us gameplay demo we went into the aforementioned studio switcheroo, and the next ten minutes or so were completely bamboozling. Eventually, after wasting our time for long enough, they showed us a trailer for the next Call of Duty, and they announced that Black Ops III would be free on PS Plus immediately. Fair play.

Sony announced that Léa Seydoux has joined the cast of Death Stranding alongside Norman Reedus and Mads Mikkelsen, but offered little when it came to what Death Stranding actually is.

If they’d filled up the time while the audience moved studios with trailers then whole thing would have worked, or you know, just don’t move an entire studio full of people for no fucking reason. But they didn’t, so here we are. Once things finally got moving again we got our first proper look at Ghost of Tsushima, an open world action game set in ancient Japan, and it was a graphical stunner. There were a couple of janky animations, and I feel like it would have looked a little cooler if everyone spoke in Japanese and they subtitled the whole thing, but it certainly looks like one to watch. We finally saw the remake of Resident Evil 2, due for release in January, and the next game from Remedy, Control, which looked interesting, but was mainly notable because Remedy had been acting as a second party developer for Microsoft for years prior to this announcement.

We saw Nioh 2, and the least awful trailer for Kingdom Hearts III of the expo, before seeing a little of Death Stranding – which we saw no gameplay of beyond Normas Reedus walking about, so we still have no idea what the game actually is – and then more footage of Spider-Man which still looks like a superhero game worthy of filling Arkham’s shoes.

Sony has easily the strongest first, second, and third party line-up of games coming in the near future, but the needlessly complicated conference format nearly derailed their messaging here. Yes, try something different if you like, but this was a misfire, and it only managed to avoid descending into farce because the games looked so strong. Perplexing and exhilarating in almost equal measure, Sony managed the seemingly impossible task of having both the best and worst conference of E3 2018, all rolled into one.

#1 Microsoft’s Brisk Conference Looked To The Future

Halo’s importance might have waned over the years, but it’s nice to see the Chief get wheeled out every now and again.

Microsoft had the only legitimately good conference of E3 2018 as far as I’m concerned, but that itself comes with a bunch of caveats that we’ll get to later. First, the good stuff.

Microsoft’s conference was quick and almost perfectly paced. It was, in many ways, like Sony’s 2016 presser which is for my money one of the best we’ve ever seen at E3. It was trailer after trailer after trailer after trailer, with very little in the way of developers waffling on awkwardly, and no celebrity cameos or bizarre transitions. There were no obvious toilet breaks, like how we used to get fifteen minutes of Call of Duty every year, and they didn’t even waste our time by bringing a car out on stage for the inevitable yearly Forza announcement.

Halo Infinite started the show, but so little was shown that it wasn’t clear if this was an actual proper Halo game or some sort of spin-off. It’s apparently a sequel to Halo 5, but I’m guessing it’s way off given how little we actually saw. There was a Life Is Strange spin-off, Devil May Cry 5, and Dying Light 2, as well as the obligitory Forza announcement, and an update on Sea of Thieves. There was five minutes spent talking about Gamepass which was the only real downer of the conference as their big announcement – that games will now install faster – felt like something that should probably be announced in a blog post rather than on stage. I’m sure they all worked real hard on it, but Xbox One’s garbage install times probably don’t need to be highlighted at all at this point. We saw Shadow of the Tomb Raider, and thankfully, they didn’t pretend it’s an exclusive this time around. In fact, they didn’t do their usual trick of pretending loads of games are exclusives when they’re really not, so that was a refreshing change.

Phil Spencer got the honour of delivering what was potentially Xbox’s most important announcement in years.

Towards the end of the presser, Phil Spencer announced that Microsoft has acquired five new first party studios including Ninja Theory. Now, short term, that’s not helping, but if you think this generation isn’t already a bust for Microsoft then I don’t know what to tell you. It’s over. It’s now about damage control with Microsoft in a holding pattern until Xbox Two arrives, and they’ll be hoping not to repeat the same mistakes they made this gen. This announcement was huge in indicating that they’re on the right course, and so while it might not have been as exciting as the games being shown off it was way more important. Microsoft desperately needs to improve their first party output so there’s a reason to pick up an Xbox over a PlayStation, and Phil Spencer knows it. They can’t just keep recycling Halo, Gears, and Forza forever.

While the studios they’ve thrown money at might not look like world beaters at the minute, remember this: when Sony bought Naughty Dog they were famous for Crash Bandicoot, and spent their first few years as a Sony first party studio making Jak & Daxter games. After years of cultivation, they’re now hands down the best studio in the industry, responsible for huge critical successes like Uncharted 2: Among Thieves, The Last of Us, and Uncharted 4: A Thief’s End. Guerrilla spent years making drab first person shooter series, Killzone, before ultimately creating one of the best games this generation, Horizon Zero Dawn. And Sucker Punch – famous for the Sly Cooper series, before transitioning to inFAMOUS – are now making open-world samurai ’em up Ghost of Tsushima. Given time, room to experiment, and the right leadership, this could be a huge deal for Microsoft, and is easily the best thing they’ve done this generation. Except maybe killing Kinect.

At the end of the show, they announced a Gears / Funko Pop collaboration which felt a little bit like that time Square Enix announced the Final Fantasy VII port for PS4 on stage at PlayStation Experience. Fortunately they redeemed themselves by quickly announcing a PC Gears game that looks like XCOM, and then Gears of War 5 which, horrendous macho bullshit dialogue aside, looks very much like the Gears game fans are after. When Phil Spencer hit the stage to thank everyone for turning up, the lights cut out mid-sentence and in an incredibly cool just-one-more-thing moment, we saw a trailer for Cyberpunk 2077. It was a fantastic finish to a strong conference.

Regardless of how good it was, most of Microsoft’s press conference was an advertisement for games you can play on your PS4.

If there’s a downside to all of this, and of course there is because the attentive among you will recall I mentioned caveats earlier, it’s that all of the most exciting games that Microsoft showed off here are on PS4. And that’s the difference between the strong PlayStation conferences of yore and this one. Halo and Gears aren’t the exciting properties they once were, and all of the third party games that are coming are on PS4, so while this was a good conference, it wasn’t necessarily a great advert for the Xbox One. If you don’t like Halo, Gears, or Forza and you already own a PS4, there was very little here that would probably convince you to buy an Xbox One, and it’s been that way since the start of the generation.

Still, well done to Microsoft for seriously upping their game, and delivering a quality press conference that entertained from start to finish and gave us plenty to look forward to in the future. Perhaps next year everyone else could arse themselves to turn up and do the same.

Feel free to leave a comment about this week’s Counter Attack in the comments section below. Which conference did you like best from E3 2018? If you want more from Counter Attack then perhaps check out E3’s Ten Most Embarrassing Moments, or The Rise and Fall of SEGA.

John can generally be found wearing Cookie Monster pyjamas with a PlayStation controller in his hands, operating on a diet that consists largely of gin and pizza. His favourite things are Back to the Future, Persona 4 Golden, the soundtrack to Rocky IV, and imagining scenarios in which he's drinking space cocktails with Commander Shepard. You can follow John on Twitter at www.twitter.com/JohnDoesntDance

8 Comments

8 Comments

  1. Patrick Murphy

    June 15, 2018 at 3:18 pm

    I honestly think you nailed it. The entirety of E3 seemed pretty lackluster and boring (and I was there), but if I had to rank the conferences, this is pretty much how I’d do it. If it weren’t for EA and Square just taking up space, I’d easily have Nintendo last. While there may be some okay games coming even if you don’t care about Smash (which I don’t), that Direct seemed really slapped together, with no pizzazz to be found.

    • John Cal McCormick

      June 18, 2018 at 3:16 am

      I think the Direct would have been okay if they’d moved it out of the E3 window. Part of the problem with Nintendo at E3 is they’re so hit and miss because I really think they’re not sure how to do it. The Direct format is fine, but being at E3 conjures certain levels of exception. A Smash Direct in Febraury and everyone is happy. Do one at E3 and it’s a disappointment because people are expecting more.

      • Patrick Murphy

        June 18, 2018 at 8:01 pm

        That’s exactly it – we’re expecting more at E3, and by this time they should know that. You may not always have something great to show, but you can dress the mediocrity up other ways. They’ve done it before, but something seemed very off this time.

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‘Oracle of Seasons’: A Game Boy Color Classic

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Oracle of Seasons

“It is an endless cycle of life… the changing seasons!”

The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Ages & Oracle of Seasons are very much two halves of the same grand adventure, but they’re both worth examining on their own merits. Seasons in particular brings with it quite an interesting history. The game that would eventually become Oracle of Seasons began life as a remake of the original Legend of Zelda. This remake would be accompanied by five other games– a remake of Zelda II: The Adventure of Link and four original titles– all developed for the Game Boy Color. These games would not be developed by Nintendo themselves, but by Flagship– a subsidiary of Capcom that was also funded in part by Nintendo and Sega.

These six games would eventually be trimmed into a trilogy slated to release in the summer, autumn, & winter of 2000, before settling as a duology that would launch simultaneously in 2001. Where Oracle of Ages was the sole survivor of the four original games, Oracle of Seasons was a brand new game morphed out of the Zelda 1 remake. Considering director Hidemaro Fujibayashi’s own reflection on Flagship’s Zelda proposal, much of what would define Seasons was always present;

 “The core of the game was pretty much decided. That is to say, the fact that it would be on the Game Boy Color, the use of the four seasons, and the decision to retain the feel of the 2D Zelda games. It was also decided that it would be a series.”

Not only was this remake never intended to be a standalone entry, it would kick start its own sub-series while featuring seasons at the forefront of the gameplay. Series creator Shigeru Miyamoto likewise asked Fujibayashi to pen a new story for the original Legend of Zelda, suggesting a fairly comprehensive remake as the end goal. With so many inherent changes, however, The Hyrule Fantasy ended up leaving the region altogether. 

“I believe the Zelda series really only started to have scenarios after the hardware specifications improved. The original Zelda was a pure action-RPG and didn’t have much of a story to begin with. I wanted to combine both those aspects (action-RPG and an actual scenario) this time around. At first, we’d only planned on creating a game one-tenth the size of the final version. But it just kept growing as development progressed and gradually turned into an original game.” 
– Hidemaro Fujibayashi, Director/Planner/Scenario Writer

Oracle of Seasons takes after Link’s Awakening and Majora’s Mask by setting itself away from Hyrule– the kingdom only ever shown during the opening cinematic. Holodrum has one of the densest worlds in a 2D Zelda game, if not the densest after A Link to the Past & A Link Between Worlds. A kingdom geographically similar to Hyrule as seen in the original Legend of Zelda, Holodrum has its own northern mountainside, a final dungeon in the northwest corner, and dozens of old men hidden amongst the land. This all makes sense since Seasons is rooted in a remake of the first game, but it isn’t as if Holodrum is without its novelties. 

Holodrum is distinct from Hyrule where it counts. The kingdom itself is quite large, sprawling when compared directly to Koholint Island. Progression often feels like a puzzle, especially when working around roadblocks early on. Holodrum’s four seasons are out of order, with the weather changing on the fly between regions. Link has to work around snow banks, overgrown trees, flooded fields, and petrified flora to overcome Holodrum’s chaos. As easy as it is to get side tracked in the vast kingdom, it’s only because there always tends to be something around the corner. Getting lost isn’t a problem when the overworld is so secret heavy. 

Old men are frequently found hiding under trees, actually giving players a reason to burn them on sight now, but new systems are in place to make exploration even more rewarding. Link will come across patches of soft soil throughout Holodrum where he can plant Gasha Seeds. Owing their name to gashapon– Japanese capsule toys not too dissimilar to blind bag toys– Gasha Seeds grow into Gasha Trees which bear Gasha Nuts after Link has defeated 40 enemies. Gasha Nut contents are randomized, but they incentivize players to return to previously explored areas. 

Not everything a Gasha Nut drops is worth the effort of chopping down 40 enemies– the worst being five regular hearts and a sole fairy– but the best rewards make it all worthwhile. While the Heart Piece tied to the Nut is probably the best overall get, Gasha Seeds naturally feed into the Ring system. Rings add an inherent RPG layer to the Oracle duology’s gameplay, offering the earliest instance of genuine player customization in the Zelda franchise. Rings, like Gasha Nuts, are completely random. Link will find many in his travels, but he needs to appraise them at Vasu’s ring shop in Horon Village before they can be used. Except in a few rare instances, Vasu’s appraisals are randomized.

There are 64 rings altogether between Seasons and Ages, all with varying effects. Which rings Link obtains can influence how players go about their game. RNG also ensures that each new playthrough is unique from the last. While this poses an obvious frustration for any completionists, it’s a fantastic way of adding another layer of replay value to an already fairly replayable experience. The Expert’s Ring allows Link to punch enemies if he unequips his weapons, the Charge Ring speeds up the Spin Attack, and the Protection Ring makes it so Link always takes one Heart of damage when attacked.

With so many rings to choose from, the gameplay is kept in balance by Link’s Ring Box. Once appraised, Link can equip his rings into his box. While he can only equip one initially, players can find a Box upgrade on Goron Mountain. With RNG already influencing which rings Link has access to, it’s unlikely two players will have the exact same experience in Oracle of Seasons– rings offering more personalization than is still usual for Zelda. Besides Gasha Nuts, Rings can be found in the overworld and dropped by Maple, a young witch who makes further use of RNG. 

Maple is Syrup’s apprentice, the recurring witch who runs the potion shop in A Link to the Past and Link’s Awakening. Riding in on her broomstick, Maple will appear after Link has killed 30 enemies. Should players bump into her, both Link & Maple will drop their treasures, prompting Maple to race the player for them. It’s almost always worthwhile to focus on what Maple’s dropped rather than what Link lost. Not only does Maple drop her own unique set of rings, she’s a convenient way of getting potions early on and will eventually drop a Heart Piece. Maple also gets progressively faster, upgrading her flying broomstick to a vacuum after enough altercations.

So much RNG can be off-putting, but Holodrum is such an extensive overworld that randomness isn’t much of an issue. Gasha Seeds drive exploration and Maple’s appearances reward it. These systems also encourage players to fight enemies head-on rather than avoid them when it’s convenient. If gameplay ever feels more involved in Oracle of Seasons than the average Zelda game, that’s because it is. This goes double when taking the very seasons into account. 

The four seasons influence overworld progression significantly and most non-dungeon puzzles center on Link using the Rod of Seasons to restore seasonal order to whatever region he’s in. Most of these puzzles solve themselves since seasons can only be changed on stumps, but concessions need to be made when an overworld features four unique versions of every region. Incredible use of the Game Boy Color’s hardware helps in this regard as well. The handheld was designed with making in-game colors pop and Oracle of Seasons– as an extremely late-life GBC game– stands out as one of the most vibrant titles in the system’s library. 

Each season has its own defining color palette– blue for winter, red for summer, green for spring, yellow for autumn– but there is always a wide range of colors on-screen. Winter matches its light blue with shades of white & gray; spring features an almost pastel color tone where gold & pink flowers bloom against soft shades of green; summer deepens most colors for a bolder effect; and autumn offsets its yellow with orange, red, and in some instances purple. Oracle of Seasons might very well have the best atmosphere on the Game Boy Color, each season stylized & recognizable with their own distinct tones. It’s a phenomenal presentation that outdoes OoS’ contemporaries. Seasons outright has better art direction than most early GBA games. 

The fact Oracle of Seasons commits to its premise in such a large overworld as strictly as it does is praiseworthy, but it’s even more impressive that there’s another world lurking underneath Holodrum. Subrosia is a bizarre underworld, easily the most eclectic setting in the franchise other than Termina (and in many respects more so.) Subrosians are culturally impolite, bathe in lava, and deal in Ore instead of Rupees. The Subrosian Market undersells a Heart Piece, volcanic eruptions are a welcome norm, and Link will be moving between Holodrum & Subrosia multiple times over the course of his journey. Players can even go on a date with a Subrosian girl, Rosa, that’s a clear play on his date with Marin from Link’s Awakening. Subrosia is so alien that it’s hard not to love every moment beneath Holodrum.

Beyond the four seasons and the dichotomy between Holodrum & Subrosia, what differentiates Oracle of Seasons most from Oracle of Ages is its focus on action. Seasons is a puzzle heavy game, but it lets combat drive the gameplay more often than not with a very action-centric tool kit. The Slingshot makes its 2D debut, replacing the Bow in the process, but its 250 seed capacity outdoes any of Link’s quivers. Its upgraded version, the Hyper Slingshot, even fires in three directions at once. The Roc’s Feather returns from Link’s Awakening to once again make jumping an important part of Link’s mobility. Not only is platforming far more frequent this time around– with the Ancient Ruins featuring quite a bit of jumping for a 2D dungeon– it upgrades into the Roc’s Cape which allows Link to glide.

The Boomerang now upgrades into a guided Magical Boomerang which players can control themselves; the Magnetic Gloves are ostensibly a better version of the Hookshot which can pull Link to & from magnetic sources, along with magnetizing certain baddies; and most enemies are designed with a combination of the sword & shield in mind. Oracle of Ages has its fair share of action as well, but not with quite the same focus as Oracle of Seasons.

In general, Seasons is a focused video game in the best ways possible. OoS always gives players a general direction to go in, but otherwise leaves Link to his own devices. There are little to no interruptions, and the gameplay loop emphasizes freedom in spite of the game’s linearity. There’s always something to do and you’re always making progress, whether that be narratively or checking in on some Gasha Nuts. The pace is perfectly suited for handheld gaming and quick burst play sessions. Only have a few minutes to play? Kill some enemies to trigger Maple. Got some time? Scope out the next dungeon and work towards saving Holodrum. 

There are also a number of side quests to round off gameplay. The main trading sequence ends with Link finding the Noble Sword in Holodrum’s Lost Woods; players can forge an Iron Shield in Subrosia by smelting red and blue ore together & bringing the refined ore to the Subrosian smithy; and Golden Beasts roam Holodrum, each appearing during a different season & in a set region. Once all four are defeated, Link can find an old man north of Horon Village who will give him the Red Ring– a ring which doubles the Sword’s attack at no expense to the player. 

All these side quests are worthwhile, especially since Oracle of Seasons is a bit on the tougher side when it comes to difficulty. Dungeons are very fast-paced, full of puzzles that are often deceptively simple. Dungeon items are used in increasingly clever ways, from traversing over bottomless pits with strategic use of the Magnetic Gloves to using the Hyper Slingshot to activate three statues at once. Notably, most bosses in Seasons are actually remixes of boss fights from the first Legend of Zelda

Aquamentus, Dodongo, Gohma, Digdogger, Manhandla, and Gleeok all return with a vengeance. Gleeok in particular puts up a serious fight, forcing Link on the offensive. Not only do players need to be quick enough to slice off Gleeok’s two heads before they can attack themselves back on, the dragon will persist as a skeleton for round 2. Explorer’s Crypt is a difficult enough dungeon where getting to the boss room with full health isn’t a guarantee, so Gleeok offers a surprising but welcome challenge as a result. 

Oracle of Seasons deserves a bit of credit for having one of the harder final bosses in the series, as well. Onox doesn’t have much in the way of personality, but he’s a tough boss to put down. His second form requires Link to use the Spin Attack to deal damage while making sure he doesn’t hit Din in the process, and Onox’s dragon form is a gauntlet of dodging, jumping, & surviving long enough to finally kill the General of Darkness. Players are bound to die once or twice, but the final dungeon is short enough where getting back to Onox takes no time at all. 

If Oracle of Seasons has one glaring flaw, however, it’s the story. The script reads like a massive step back coming off the heels of Link’s Awakening, Ocarina of Time, and especially Majora’s Mask. Link is summoned to aid the Oracle Din, already a seasoned hero and implied to be the same Link from A Link to the Past, but very little time is spent fleshing out Din as a character & giving players a reason to care about her. Her role is more akin to Zelda in A Link to the Past than Marin in Link’s Awakening. Similarly, Onox is an undercooked villain who shows up to kidnap Din and does nothing for the rest of the story. Of course, this light story stems from Seasons’ origin as a remake of The Legend of Zelda

Early press of the game– when it was still going by the name Acorn of the Tree of Mystery– indicates that the story was originally set in Hyrule and the seasons went out of order when Ganon kidnapped Princess Zelda, the guardian of both the Triforce of Power & the four seasons. Hyrule was changed to Holodrum, Ganon became Onox, Zelda turned to Din, and the eight fragments of the Triforce presumably became the eight Essences of Nature. While underwhelming, the plot’s structure if nothing else makes sense. 

It’s worth pointing out that Oracle of Seasons seems to recognize that story is its weakness and lets the gameplay drive the experience. Unlike Oracle of Ages which takes its plot seriously and has a clear thematic arc, Seasons really is just a remix of Zelda 1’s plot. Which is perfect for the kind of game OoS ultimately is: a fast-paced, action-packed adventure through an ever-changing world. When played as a precursor to Ages instead of its ending, Seasons’ story comes off comparatively better. The stakes aren’t that high or defined, but that’s more than okay for the first half of an adventure that spans two full-length games. 

In a departure for the franchise, Oracle of Seasons actually features a proper post-game, marking the first time any Zelda acknowledges that the main threat is over. NPCs will comment on how they haven’t seen Link in a while, the weather has stabilized as spring has set in Holodrum, and you’re free to wrap up any side quests left unfinished. This is especially noteworthy because players can link their progress from Seasons over into Ages and transfer any rings they have on hand. 

An epilogue makes for a charming send-off to one of the most charming games on the Game Boy Color. Oracle of Seasons underwent a strange development, intended to be little more than a suped-up remake of the original Legend of Zelda. Instead, Flagship ended up developing one of the finest games on the GBC– a vibrant adventure filled with personality and some of the best action on the handheld. Oracle of Seasons isn’t just one half of a greater game; it’s a classic Zelda in its own right.

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Games

PAX Online: ’30XX’ and ‘Cris Tales’

Our coverage of PAX Online continues with a Mega Man-inspired roguelike and a charming, time-hopping RPG adventure.

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30XX and Cris Tales

Our coverage of PAX Online continues with a Mega Man-inspired roguelike and a charming, time-hopping RPG adventure.

30XX

30XX

Platforms: PS4, Xbox One, Switch, and Steam
Release: TBA

I’ve already given some of my thoughts on 30XX back when I took it for a spin at PAX East. To catch those who didn’t see that report up to speed, 30XX is a 2D side-scrolling roguelike with a hi-bit art style and gameplay reminiscent of many Mega Man games. It’s generally more forgiving than Mega Man in the sense that there’s a distinct lack of instant-death spikes and pits, but the tradeoff is that when you do die that’s the end and you have to start the whole game over from the start. Classic roguelike rules for ya.

This PAX Online demo was very similar to the one I played at East. I chose between the blaster Nina or swordsman Ace then I went on my merry way throughout the two levels. One key difference is that I did not start out with any specials this time around and my maximum health was much lower. This is probably in-line with what it would be like to start a new game completely fresh as opposed to some upgrades as the East demo had. As a result, I actually failed my first attempt at this demo.

That’s where the first additional aspect of this build came into play, though, in the form of global character progression. Beating bosses in 30XX not only grants you a new weapon ability but also a currency called Memoria. Memoria can be spent at a shop in-between playthroughs to obtain permanent upgrades for Nina and Ace for every subsequent attempt. The pickings were rather slim for the demo, such as increased health and energy, but a wider variety is promised for the full release, and if anything it’s exceptionally clear how useful they’ll be to fully clear the game’s ten planned stages in one go. I also await the inevitable “no upgrade” runs that will assuredly come out of this, though.

30XX

The other neat addition to this demo is Entropy conditions, which are essentially modifiers. You can make it to where shop items cost more Nut currency to purchase per run, impose a time limit, and/or increase the amount of HP enemies have. Enabling these options also increases rewards gained from runs, adding a nice risk vs. reward factor that will probably keep things engaging even after you master the game’s earlier stages. More Entropy conditions are promised to be added into the full game that will allow you to fine-tune your experience even further.

The one concern I have for 30XX at this point is the number of dead ends I encountered with no reward to show for it. This is probably a result of the procedurally generated nature of the game, but the number of times I thought I was so clever for platforming up to a hard-to-reach area only to be greeted by a wall was more than I cared for. This is the “30XX Very Pre-Alpha Demo”, though, so it’s a flaw that can still be fixed in future development and with everything else that is being done right so far — the tight platforming, varied progression, and delightful aesthetics — it’s not hard to be hopeful for 30XX‘s future.

Cris Tales

Cris Tales

Platforms: PS4, Xbox One, Switch, Steam, and Stadia
Release: Nov 17th, 2020

I went into the Cris Tales demo after hearing nothing but its name in passing here and there. After finishing the demo, I’d recommend you do the same. If you’re a fan of turn-based RPG’s just download the demo and see it for yourself.

Cris Tales managed to constantly surprise and delight me throughout the entirety of its 45-minute long demo, firstly being the visuals. Playing through the game is like watching stained-glass art come to life with its hyper-stylized character designs that emphasize general shapes rather than specific details and environments chock-full of geometrical sharp edges. I was in awe from the word “Go”.

The story follows Crisbell, a chipper young orphan girl who spends her time happily doing chores for the orphanage and her dearest Mother Superior. After chasing a dapper young frog to a church, Crisbell inadvertently awakens the powers of Time Crystals hosed there and gains the power to see both the past and future at the same time. This manifests as the screen fractures into thirds with the left side showing the past, the middle the present, and the right the future at all times.

It was a trick that took a minute or two to register with me, but once it did I immediately set about traipsing all about the town I had just chased the frog through in order to see how it has and will change. It was a positively fascinating experience that put a big stupid grin on my face the entire time.

Crisbell can use this knowledge of that past and future to make decisions in the present such as locating a missing potion label or creating a concoction that will prevent wood from rotting and leading to dilapidated houses. Choosing which house to restore is also an irreversible choice that will lead to different outcomes depending.

Cris Tales

Time manipulation also plays a major part in Cris Tales‘ turn-based combat in extremely novel and creative ways. Enemies attack Crisbell and co from both the left and the right, and you can attack them with your standard RPG basic attacks and skills. Enemies on the left side, however, can be forcibly sent to the past while enemies on the right to the future by expending Crystal Points. This means reverting a big brawny goblin into a harmless little child or aging it into an elder that can barely move.

That’s not all, though. Douse an armored enemy in water then send them to the future to cause it to rust and shatter their defense. Poison an enemy that has already been sent to the past then brings them back to the present to force them to take all that poison damage at once. Plant a damaging mandragora that would normally take a few turns to sprout then send it to the future to cause it to sprout instantly. These are the examples demonstrated in the demo but it’s abundantly clear that this is only the tip of the creative iceberg. It’s genuinely thrilling to imagine all the possibilities such a system is capable of. The best part is that we won’t have to wait long to find out as Cris Tales launches on all major platforms in just two months.

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Game Reviews

‘AVICII Invector Encore Edition’ Review: Rhythm and Melancholy

‘AVICII Invector: Encore Edition’ is a music and rhythm game perfect for newcomers and fans of the genre.

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AVICII Invector Encore Edition Review

Developer: Hello There Games | Publisher: Wired Productions | Genre:  Rhythm | Platforms: Nintendo Switch, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Steam | Reviewed on: Nintendo Switch


In terms of a pure adrenaline rush, nothing tops a well-designed rhythm game. Good rhythm games let players feel a euphoric sense of flow and even excitement. But the best the genre has to offer taps into the heart of music itself. AVICII Invector Encore Edition is a rhythm game perfect for newcomers to the genre but also works as a moving tribute.

I can’t tell where the journey will end
But I know where to start

Whether it’s tapping buttons in time with the beat, smashing feet on a dance pad, or moving an entire body in front of an IR camera, rhythm and music games have always been popular. AVICII Invector Encore Edition takes inspiration from music games that came before it but stands firmly on its own. It’s wonderfully accessible, truly a music game for anyone. From diehard fans of the rhythm game genre to people who are simply AVICII fans who also have a console, Invector checks a lot of boxes.

Levels across AVICII Invector play largely the same. The player picks a track and a difficulty level, and is off to the races. They control a slick spaceship moving forward along a track, and must tap or hold buttons as the ship passes over them. This “falling jewel” style has been popular from the Guitar Hero franchise and beyond, but Invector finds ways to make it feel unique. The art direction is breathtakingly stellar, taking players on far-out trips through cyberpunk-esque cities and crumbling pathways. There are even portions of each level where the player can steer their spaceship Star Fox-style through rings and around pillars to keep their point multiplier up.

Invector feels like it’s trying to affect as many sensory inputs as it can. Though Encore Edition is fully playable on handheld mode on Switch, Invector shines brightest on a big screen with a thumping sound system. The neighbors might get annoyed, but who would hear them complaining?

Tracks are divided up by worlds, with four to five tracks each. Worlds must be cleared sequentially, by scoring at least seventy-five percent on each level in that world. While this may sound initially restrictive, Encore Edition gives players access to two extra worlds with five tracks each right out of the gate, so players have plenty to play with at the start.

There are three difficulties available, and each mode offers a different experience. For players who just want to experience AVICII’s music in a low-stress way while enjoying amazing visuals and ambiance, Easy mode is the way to play. Anything above that amps the difficulty up significantly, with Hard mode escalating the required precision to an unbelievable degree. Building up a competitive high score can only be achieved by hitting multipliers and keeping a streak going. At higher difficulties, Invector feels challenging but exhilarating. Scoring above ninety percent on any difficulty mode above Easy feels extremely good, and the online leaderboards are the perfect place to boast about that achievement. During high level play, earning a high score feels transcendent.

Worlds and levels are strung together with brief, lightly-animated cutscenes. It’s a slim justification for a rhythm game, but they’re better than nothing and provide just enough context to keep things interesting. AVICII Invector is both visually and aurally pleasing, but even if the player isn’t a diehard fan of EDM or House music, there is plenty to love.

This world can seem cold and grey
But you and I are here today
And we won’t fade into darkness

AVICII Invector is a truly fantastic rhythm game. But it’s also more than that. It is impossible to play Invector and not feel a twinge of melancholy. The game is a tribute to a hard-working perfectionist, but the man behind the music had his demons. Though the visuals are enticing and the gameplay electric, it is difficult not to feel sad from the opening credits. It is to Invector‘s credit that all throughout, the game feels like a joyful celebration of Tim Bergling’s music. It is a worthy tribute to a man who revitalized and reinvigorated the EDM and House music scene.

At the end of the day, almost every aspect of AVICII Invector reflects a desire to connect. For players connected to the internet, global leaderboards are a great opportunity to share high scores. Invector is much more forgiving than Thumper or Rez or even anything in the Hatsune Miku catalog. Players can cruise through this game on Easy mode if they want, and they won’t be punished. The Encore Edition even includes a split-screen multiplayer, which is fantastically fun.

In his music, Bergling worked across genres to expand what pop music could look like. With Invector, music lovers and players of nearly any skill level can have a pleasing experience. In video games, that’s rare, and it should be celebrated.

According to publisher Wired Productions’ website, all music royalties from AVICII Invector Encore Edition will support suicide awareness through the Tim Bergling Foundation.

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