Connect with us
Shawshank REdemption Shawshank REdemption

Film

25 Years Later: ‘The Shawshank Redemption’ is Still Prison Cinema’s Gold Standard

Published

on

When the topic of Stephen King film adaptations gets raised, the very mention of the author and his movies often conjure images of pulpy horror villains and frightening locales. It’s not an unfair thought either, as the guy absolutely dominated the arena for a number of years with genre-defining films like The Shining and Carrie adapting his stories. With the recent release of It: Chapter Two, the situation may feel as though the modern master of terror is a one-trick pony, but it’s important to remember the success that his other dramatic stories have also enjoyed. Of these, the most notable and critically acclaimed is The Shawshank Redemption, a 1994 prison drama that set the gold standard for cinema behind bars.

Taking place in the titular prison, The Shawshank Redemption’s story of friendship, hope, and the mental toll of incarceration is both haunting and inspiring. While on the surface the narrative centers on maintaining hope and faith in the face of adversity, the larger picture incorporates a number of religious themes and life lessons to offer quasi-religious advice for those seeking freedom from whatever prison they find themselves confined. Even without these themes, The Shawshank Redemption is still a film worthy of repeated viewings, never losing its charm because of its spectacular story, skillful actors, and awesome cinematography.

Prison Bound

At its very core, Shawshank Redemption centers around the relationship between Andy and Red, two convicts in the Shawshank State Penitentiary. Andy, who has been sentenced for the murder his wife in response to her infidelity, is an offbeat character who never seems to bow under the weight of his situation, and Red, another convicted murderer, just seems to make the best of things. Together, they build a friendship behind bars, struggling against the systemic corruption of the prison system and the dehumanizing position in which Shawshank’s inhabitants are forced to live.

Uniquely King

In its treatment of male friendship and portrayal of the bonds between characters, The Shawshank Redemption feels spiritually akin to another Stephen King penned work, Stand by Me. Both stories put close bonds between male characters at the center of focus, stepping away from the traditional narrative devices like romantic leads and thrilling action. Although one is a coming of age story and the other is a stark prison drama, both films feel linked through the growth and emotional development of their characters without relying on the classic horror motifs that traditionally punctuate works by King. Instead, they share a deep understanding of the underlying workings of humans, telling stories through their psyches rather than their baser emotions.

For the most part, these thematic similarities stem from the fact that the text inspirations for both of these works come from the same King collection, Different Seasons. This bundle of novellas includes “The Body” (Stand by Me), “Rita Hayward and the Shawshank Redemption” (The Shawshank Redemption), “Apt Pupil” (later made into a film by the same name), and the unused “Breathing Method.” Together, these novellas all share a number of closely related meanings, with all centering around the concept of the character molding journey. In the collection, this idea is explored in relation to the changing of the seasons, illustrating the evolution of emotions and the human experience in various stages of life.

The Shawshank Redemption

As always, Freeman steals the show

The highlight of The Shawshank Redemption is, without at doubt, Morgan Freeman’s portrayal of Red. Although at the time he wasn’t as well known for his narrative gifts, Freeman’s role is certainly an early hint at the type of work that would characterize his later career. As the film’s story is predominantly told from Red’s perspective, Freeman gets ample opportunity to showcase the generally beautiful tone of his voice, and the thoughtful emotions that the actor can imbue it with.

Ironically, Freeman was never supposed to play Red in the first place. In the text, Red was supposed to be a redheaded Irishman (hence the name), but the producer actually pushed for Freeman instead. The film even makes a subtle nod to this inaccuracy, as Red jokingly says that he gets his name because “maybe because I’m Irish.”

Honestly, the inclusion of Freeman works to The Shawshank Redemption’s advantage, adding another layer of depth to the friendship of Andy and Red because of their racial differences. Although it is not overtly explored as the story progresses, the intersection of race and the struggle of incarceration leads to interesting possibilities about interpretations and makes their friendship feel more genuine and unique.

Making history

Although The Shawshank Redemption was initially slow at the box office, it was nominated for seven Academy Awards and became the highest-grossing rental in the year it was released. Despite being released among incredibly tough competition, most notably Pulp Fiction and Forrest Gump, the film also generally ranks above those movies in critics polls.

Regardless of all the critical acclaim, there’s a certain quality to The Shawshank Redemption that lingers. It’s so touching in its treatment of friendship and cold in its treatment of prison that these opposite extremes make for an unrivaled experience in prison dramas. If you haven’t seen this movie, do so, and if you have, watch it again. It’s surely worth the two-hour run time and then some.

Ty is here to talk gaming and chew bubblegum, but he's all out of gum. Writer and host of the Stadia Wave Podcast, he is an Animal Crossing Fanatic, a Mario Kart legend, and a sore loser at Smash. Add him on Switch @Creepshow101, PSN/Live at Grimelife13, or Stadia at Grimelife and play!

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Film

70 Best Movie Posters of 2019

Published

on

Best Movie Posters of 2019

Deciding the best movie posters is no easy task…

I remember when I was younger, I used to head to the video store and rent movies I’d never heard of based solely on the movie poster art. This was, of course, a different time— sure, the internet was a thing, but we didn’t have countless websites, not to mention social media platforms, promoting new movies online with news stories, movie stills, featurettes, teasers, trailers and so on. Not to say that sort of marketing didn’t exist in the past, because it did, but it wasn’t always in your face. For better or for worse, the internet changed the way studios market movies, but one thing that hasn’t changed is the use of a poster to help build excitement and anticipation for an upcoming film. Most posters continue to be an important marketing tool for filmmakers worldwide and so once again, we’ve decided to collect images of our favourite movie posters revealed over the past twelve months. If you checked out our list of the best movie posters of 2018, you’ll remember it included posters for indie gems, thrillers, horror movies, foreign language films, Hollywood blockbusters and everything in between. This year is no different, although it should be said that some marketing campaigns were so good, we’ve decided to include more than one poster for a few select films. Also worth noting, we didn’t include any fan-made poster art below. That out of the way, here are the best movie posters of 2019.

The Best Movie Posters of 2019

Continue Reading

TIFF

The Piercing ‘Marriage Story’ Is Noah Baumbach’s Best Film to Date

TIFF 2019

Published

on

Marriage Story

In 2010, director Noah Baumbach began divorce proceedings with his now ex-wife, Jennifer Jason Leigh. The divorce was finalized three years later, and since then Baumbach has been in a relationship with actor and director (and occasional collaborator) Greta Gerwig. It’s impossible to view his newest film, Marriage Story, without taking into account his own dissolved marriage; this is a searching, seething work of recriminations and longing that pits two all–too–human parents against each other, and invites the audience to not only imagine which bits of psychic trauma are his own, but also to consider our own relationships, successful or not.

Marriage Story stars Scarlett Johansson and Adam Driver as Nicole and Charlie, a married couple living in New York City with their young son Henry. The film opens with a montage as Nicole recites the things she most loves about her husband, from the way he can cook and doesn’t mind waking up with their son, to his skill as a theater director. In turn, Charlie narrates his favorite aspects of Nicole, his regular lead actor. There are plenty of opportunities for tears here, but the unguarded emotions of these confessions might get them started right from the beginning. But just as they finish reciting these traits, we’re brought back to reality; these confessions were things that they had written down to read to each other as a kind of peace offering at the start of their mediation following a separation that has led up to their divorce. But Nicole doesn’t like what she has written — or at least doesn’t want Charlie to hear it. And if she won’t go, then it’s not really fair for him to read his. So neither tells each other what they most admire in the other, and instead stop seeing the mediator.

It’s the first strike in Nicole and Charlie’s mutually assured destruction agreement. Though they initially plan on avoiding using lawyers, Nicole gets tipped off to a well-regarded attorney (a funny and ice-cold Laura Dern) who advises her to take a maximalist position in order to ensure she gets half of everything she wants — at the very least. Once she has a lawyer, Charlie tries out a variety of legal counsels (a soothing Alan Alda and a fiery Ray Liotta), but the real conflict comes down to location; Nicole has taken Henry to Los Angeles while she films a pilot, and wants to stay even after it’s finished. Charlie, however, thought they would move back to New York. Each escalation in the feud necessitates an opposing reaction, and the two are driven further and further apart, even as they try to stay close for the sake of their son.

Marriage Story

Baumbach has admitted that some details of the film are based on his own divorce, but he’s also said he interviewed many of his friends who divorced around the same time, as well as lawyers and judges involved in divorce cases. In some ways, Marriage Story isn’t just a portrait of a couple separating, but a primer on divorce court that far surpasses something like Kramer vs. Kramer, which was out of date even in 1979. The film is also an opportunity to observe two of the best living actors at the top of their game. Johansson and Driver have a knack for finding the sweet spot between un-actorly naturalism and the stylistic ticks that we recognize as compelling acting. It gives us a sense that these people were actually a family, and really cared for each other. Baumbach’s script helps; it’s maybe his best writing ever, filled with so many painfully open moments, yet leavened with just the right amount of humor. He’s also as fair as he could be, and neither parent comes off as too saintly or self-centered.

Marriage Story ends in a circle of sorts with the discovery of Nicole’s notes about Charlie’s best qualities. Their marriage was effectively over before the film even started, but I kept thinking back to that lovely introductory scene. How might their journey to divorce progressed if they had the courage to speak openly to each other in that one moment? Perhaps something might have been better. Marriage Story doesn’t harbor any of those romantic illusions, however; once it’s over, it’s over.

Editor’s Note: This article was originally published on September 12, 2019, as part of our coverage of the Toronto International Film Festival.

Continue Reading

Film

Don’t Be Sad ‘A Rainy Day in New York’ Never Made it to Manhattan

Spend this rainy day playing a board game or something

Published

on

Rainy Day in New York

You do not come to late-era Woody Allen for anything resembling true originality. He is the drunken piano man, riffing off the same old hits in the same old bar, hoping that nostalgia will hit a chord with somebody. As in Midnight in Paris, Blue Jasmine, or even Irrational Man, his output over the last decade can still bring up moments of true inspiration and fresh-feeling angles on the same old tales, even if the plot-lines feel somewhat familiar. In the best humanist cinema, like that of Rohmer or Ozu, this repetition can make you see the same thing in a slightly different way. The same cannot be said of A Rainy Day in New York, a film so derivative it feels like it came out of an auto-generator, making me feel nothing but contempt for the waste of so much talent. If you are an American Woody Allen fan sad that this movie never made it to Manhattan, there’s honestly no need to be.

Timotheé Chalamet stars and narrates in a performance so poor that he must be happy this film hasn’t released back in the States. He plays Gatsby Wells, a student at upstate Yardley College, a place he detests yet tolerates because his beloved girlfriend Ashleigh (Elle Fanning) — heiress to a rich banking empire in Tucson — also studies there. As a writer for the University paper, she gets the chance to interview famous director Roland Pollard (Liev Schreiber), giving them the possibility to explore New York together. Yet when they arrive there, a series of misunderstandings, mishaps, and fear of missed opportunities keeps them perpetually apart, handing them the chance to explore romance with others — including old flames, movie stars and, of course, high-priced escorts. 

Although his first name is Gatsby, Wells better resembles the other great male of 20th century American literature: Holden Caulfield. Like the protagonist of The Catcher in the Rye, he is born of massive privilege, shunning his supposedly phoney origins while still visiting the fanciest hotels and drinking in the fanciest bars. There is perhaps some kind of interesting modern portrait of New York privilege in here, but Woody Allen is simply not the right director for the material. It’s like asking a jazz pianist to bash out a techno tune. 

And just as Allen’s blinkered view of New York blinds him to the real world and its contemporary concerns, Chalamet’s nostalgia act cannot find a way to escape Woody’s wooden writing. The sensitive, pretentious, sensual young man who turned in such a deeply felt performance in Call Me By Your Name could be a natural fit for a Woody Allen character, if only he actually leaned into what makes him a great actor instead of trying his best Woody Allen imitation. While some actors can do Woody Allen well (Kenneth Branagh is uncanny in Celebrity, while Larry David is great in Whatever Works), Timotheé Chalamet has neither the studied talent to impersonate well, nor the arrogance to put his own distinctive stamp on it. Elle Fanning is similarly dire; playing both an intrepid, impetuous journalist and a thick floozy, she carries neither the charm nor the wit to make her a compelling co-lead.  

A Rainy Day in New York

I don’t blame either actor; they’re young, and there’s a feeling that they weren’t given much direction. In fact, almost every aspect of A Rainy Day in New York feels underdeveloped, underwritten, and under-thought. This is a film so lazy that it even recycles the ending of Midnight in Paris, perhaps hoping that the audience developed amnesia since 2011. Even Allen’s trademark eye for Manhattan is missing. Filming here properly for the first time since 2009, the city no longer seems like much of a character by itself, and instead comes off as it would in a generic TV Christmas Movie. 

While Allen’s early 00s work — easily his worst period — is characterised by its TV-movie lighting, his collaborations over the past ten years with cinematographers such as Darius Khondji (Midnight in Paris, To Rome With Love), Javier Aguirresarobe (Blue Jasmine), and Vittorio Stororo (Cafe Society, Wonder Wheel) elevated his films’ look considerably, even when the writing may have been lacking. Sadly here, the legendary cinematographer behind Apocalypse Now and The Conformist — despite what seems like his best efforts to light generic hotel rooms with warmth and vibrancy — cannot save A Rainy Day in New York at all, which feels even more rushed and cut-to-pieces than usual. This is really only for die-hard Woody Allen completists; casual minds need not bother.

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Advertisement

Trending